http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/303734

Teacher's blog: Students 'rude, lazy, disengaged whiners'

Posted Feb 16, 2011 by Vincent Sobotka
Natalie Monroe, for now, remains a Pennsylvania English teacher at Central Bucks East High School, claiming her anonymous Internet blog was never meant to be widely read after the forum was discovered by students last week.
Natalie Munroe  30  English teacher at Central Bucks East High School in Pennsylvania.
Natalie Munroe, 30, English teacher at Central Bucks East High School in Pennsylvania.
Central Bucks High School
Using the code-name "Natalie M." the 30-year-old teacher further defended the innocence of her latest ordeal as a "misunderstanding," pointing out that she only had nine followers - seven friends, her husband and herself - despite her critical insults to students, fellow teachers and the administration.
Comments appearing throughout Munroe's blog include, "I hear the trash company is hiring," "A complete and utter jerk," "although academically okay, your child has no redeeming qualities," and "There's no other way to say this, I hate your kid."
And that hardly concludes the outbursts of negativity from Munroe.
She also created a list of comments that teachers could use to describe students on their report cards, such as "rat-like," "dresses like a streetwalker," and "frightfully dim."
The superintendent of Central Bucks East High School stated that Munroe's complaints were "very egregious" and "certainly could result in termination." After the teacher was escorted from the building on suspension with pay.
ABC News reports that Munroe's attorney, Steve Rovner, is insisting that Munroe's first amendment right is being violated.
"There's no Internet policy at her school district. She was free to write and she free to express herself; it was like a personal diary. She didn't do anything wrong – some people don't like what they have to write, but she's being censored for what she wrote," Rovner said. "Until the school district decides what to do with her, her life is in limbo."
Natalie Munroe has continued to defend herself after the ordeal, and not just to the media. Munroe is still blogging (oh, yes, it's still up). An excerpt from her latest post, from Saturday, February 12, 2011 - titled, "Bloggate - Day 1: The Scandal Begins" portrays her blame on the media for taking what she said out of context:
What bothers me so much about this situation is that what I wrote is being taken out of context. Of my 84 blogs, 60 of them had absolutely nothing to do with school or work. Of the 24 that mentioned it, only some of them were actually focused on it--others may have mentioned it in passing, like if I was listing things that annoyed me that day and wrote without any elaboration that students were annoying that day.
In essence, people are latching onto pieces of what I wrote without A. knowing any back story, and B. knowing the whole story. The student or parents who took it upon themselves to dig up my blog--and be assured that that is what happened, as they were looking for it and didn't just stumble upon it--are the ones who started this fracas, and they also made sure that only pieces of the whole picture came to light. I'm sure the media helped with that second part, too. After all, a juicy story is more exciting to the masses.
The post in it's entirety describes, in Munroe's words, the events of the day her blog was discovered.
As a reader, you have the liberty of making your opinions heard or read when you come across a news story. So, if you'd like to read Natalie Munroe's blog and even become one of her followers (as of now, she has 256), you may. I encourage any and all reactions to be shared in this article.
Fingers crossed in hopes of hearing for Mrs. Munroe herself.