http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/286804

President's Budget axes moon mission, focus is on middle class

Posted Feb 1, 2010 by Stephanie Dearing
The release of the President's Budget has confirmed the rumours that NASA's moon mission would be scrubbed. With millions of other cuts and reductions to control the deficit, the budget was unveiled Monday.
President Barack Obama outlined his strategy on Afghanistan and Pakistan at the U.S. Military Academ...
President Barack Obama outlined his strategy on Afghanistan and Pakistan at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.
White House
Washington, D.C. - In explaining the cuts to the moon mission, the White House explains "Costs for the program had grown by billions of dollars and the first elements of the system were not projected to be available until 2015." Instead of funding the moon mission, also known as "Constellation," "... the President’s Budget funds a redesigned and reinvigorated program that focuses on leveraging advanced technology, international partnerships, and commercial capabilities to set the stage for a revitalized human space flight program for the 21st Century. The President’s Budget will also increase NASA’s funding, accelerating work -- constrained for years due to the budget demands of Constellation -- on climate science, green aviation, science education, and other priorities."
Other cuts were made to natural preservation and conservation programs, the Anthrax vaccine project, the Department of Agriculture's Economic Action Program and the Voice of America among many others. One of the notable cuts was made to tax incentives for natural resource exploration, such as oil and gas. The cuts and reductions have been put into place in an attempt to reduce the ballooning U.S. deficit, which currently stands at $1.56 trillion.
With a view of supporting the American middle-class in 2011-2012, the new budget released Monday morning by President Barack Obama. "... includes plans to encourage small businesses to hire as quickly and effectively as possible, to make additional investments in infrastructure, and to jump-start clean energy investments that will help the private sector create good jobs in America." Addressing concerns about the Wall Street bail-outs, the Presidential address goes on to say "Long before this crisis hit, middle-class families were under growing strain. For decades, Washington failed to address fundamental weaknesses in the economy: rising health-care costs, a growing dependence on foreign oil, and an education system unable to prepare our children for the jobs of the future. In recent years, spending bills and tax cuts for the wealthy were approved without paying for any of it, leaving behind a mountain of debt. And while Wall Street gambled without regard for the consequences, Washington looked the other way." The budget deals with that by beefing up the amount of money regulators have to police Wall Street.
Americans are afraid that the American Dream is dead, and Obama's message was an encouragement to hope once again with the promise to spend the issues near and dear to the middle class American's heart -- health care, education, green energy and job creation. Obama also promised to balance the budget, excepting interest payments on the debt, by 2015.
The total budget comes to $3.8 trillion, with $100 billion earmarked for job creation.