http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/285706

Haitians using corpses as roadblocks

Posted Jan 14, 2010 by Paul Wallis
Reports are coming in of Haitians using corpses as roadblocks to protest the lack of assistance they’re receiving. Looting is also being reported. There are no indications of authority in action in the capital Port au Prince.
Reports are coming in of Haitians using corpses as roadblocks to protest the lack of assistance they’re receiving. Looting is also being reported. There are no indications of authority in action in the capital Port au Prince.
The stories are coming in thick and fast, and none of them so far have been good. Google News has 37,000+ articles, and the message is the same. Haiti is a wreck. Gangs with machetes, and crowds without food are the backdrop to a country in meltdown. There are now warnings that food and water could run out in the next few days.
Everything is lacking. Children without parents are left to fend for themselves. 90 per cent of the town of Carrefour, the epicenter of the quake is reported as destroyed.
According to the Times of India, the Haitian quake may be the second worst in modern history.
Too many planes are coming in. US aviation authorities have requested that the Haitian flight controllers not authorize any more incoming flights to clear the backlog. The airfields are also running out of jet fuel.
The UN has suffered the biggest loss of life among its personnel in one day.
The UN building in Port au Prince is flattened.
It’s an indicator of the confusion on the ground that even the numbers aren’t reconciling. Death toll estimates are currently around the 50,000 mark, but the 100,000 figure is still being used as a final estimate.
Meanwhile, a British search and rescue team in a helicopter was turned away…. by the US military, trying to deal with the airfield chaos.
Sea transport may be the way to deal with the impossibilities of the airlift situation, but three days food for a whole country isn't likely to be a pretty situation. There's no indication that distribution centers have been set up, let alone are functioning. The water situation means that the disease potential of the situation will get worse, soon.
Aid agencies are also reporting a lack of tents.
Port au Prince wasn't the place you'd want to see an earthquake. The "flimsy" tag given to the city didn't mention that many of the houses are jammed together like haphazard parquetry. The link above is to Google Earth's current images. Google has been trying to update its images as fast as possible to help aid agencies.
One of the poorest countries on Earth is in utter chaos. Let's hope this relief effort isn't a repeat of Hurricane Katrina.