http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/280286

President Obama passes on meeting with the Dalai Lama

Posted Oct 9, 2009 by Jay David Murphy
The Dalai Lama was in Washington this week meeting with politicians, scientists, and students. Notably missing from the schedule was President Obama who will meet with His Holiness after a November meeting with Chinese leader Hu Jintao.
Dalai Lama and Senator Harry Reid
Nevada Senator Harry Reid and His Holiness the Dalai Lama after a meeting they had in the U.S. Capitol.
Courtest of Senator Harry Reid
The Dalai Lama was in the United States this week visiting with dignitaries and politicians on his continuing mission of the regaining the sovereignty of Tibet which has been on going for decades.
He spoke with students at the American University, scientist, and politicians. But so far he as not met with President Obama which would be the first time a sitting President as not had an audience with the religious leader.
President Obama has agreed to meet with him only after meeting with Chinese leader Hu Jintao in November. This move by the President has caused a curious stir in politics in Washington.
In an article from NPR (National Public Radio) they have said, “The White House has issued a statement describing this postponement with the Dalai Lama as “mutual”. Both Obama and the Dalai Lama get it, they understand that doing what is best for the Tibetan people sometimes involves hard decisions and, often, involves patience and diplomacy.”
Senator Harry Reid did meet with His Holiness and in an email response had this to say to Digital Journals Jay David Murphy, “During our brief meeting, we discussed many important issues including the current situation in his native Tibet. I remain concerned about religious freedom, cultural freedom and human rights for Tibetans, and believe these issues should be an important part of our discussions with China. The Dalai Lama is a symbol of peace and hope for so many around the world and his work on behalf of the people of Tibet continues to be a source of inspiration for his countrymen.”
During a visit in 1993, I had the opportunity to spend a day with the Dalia Lama and learned of his concerns for the Tibetan peoples and his genuine concerns for the people of the world in these modern times. He was and remains both serious about his mission and quick witted, always ready with a smile and an antidote.
The 14th Dalai Lama, Tensin Gyatso, is both the head of state and the spiritual leader of Tibet. He was born in 1935 in the small farming community of Taktser, Amdo, in northeastern Tibet.
At the age of two he was recognized as the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama, Thubten Gyatso.
The Dalai Lamas are believed to be manifestations of Avalokiteshvara or Chenrezig, the Bodhisattva of Compassion and patron saint of Tibet. Bodhisattvas are enlightened beings who have postponed their own nirvana and chosen to take rebirth in order to serve humanity.
In 1950, he assumed full political power after China's invasion of Tibet in 1949. In 1954, he went to Beijing for peace talks with Mao Zedong and other Chinese leaders, including Deng Xiaoping and Chou Enlai. In 1959, with the suppression of the Tibetan national uprising in Lhasa by Chinese troops, he was forced to escape into exile. Since then he has been living in Dharamsala, northern India, and the seat of the Tibetan political administration in exile.
In 1989 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his non-violent struggle for the liberation of Tibet. He also became the first Nobel Laureate to be recognized for his concern for global environmental problems.
The Dalai Lama has traveled to more than 62 countries spanning 6 continents. He has met with presidents, prime ministers and crowned rulers of major nations. He has held dialogues with the heads of different religions and many well-known scientists.