http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/277408

Canadian Mounties break up erectile dysfunction drug ring

Posted Aug 11, 2009 by Kathlyn Stone
Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Montreal seized thousands of counterfeit pills intended for the erectile dysfunction market. The illegal sale of prescription and counterfeit drugs online and on the street are on the rise in Canada and elsewhere.
Following searches at sex shops and other locations in Montreal, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) last week arrested members of an organization suspected of distributing counterfeit erectile dysfunction drugs.
The nine arrested could face charges of fraud, conspiracy to commit fraud, infringement of a registered trade-mark and distribution of materials protected by copyright, according to information released by the RCMP.
The arresting officers seized more than 15,000 counterfeit pills following an 18-month investigation. Health Canada confirmed that the counterfeit pills contained some of the active ingredients found in genuine erectile dysfunction drugs.
The RCMP said the illegal sales of pharmaceuticals are growing on the Internet, on the streets and in places of business.
After the arrests, Health Canada issued a citizens advisory about the dangers of buying prescription drugs online.
“If you order from these sites, you may get counterfeit drugs that may contain the incorrect dose, the wrong ingredients, dangerous additives, or no active ingredients at all, which could result in potentially serious health risks,” according to the statement. “Even if these drugs do not harm you directly or immediately, your condition may get worse without effective treatment.”
The health agency said people ordering drugs off the Internet could reduce their risk of purchasing counterfeit drugs by avoiding companies or sites that don’t list a street address, telephone number or way of contacting a pharmacist; offer prescription drugs without a prescription; issue a prescription based on an online questionnaire; claim to have a cure for any serious condition; sell products that are not approved for sale in Canada; or sell products that are being provided directly to consumers from foreign sources.