http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/274524

Ahmadinejad: no 'circle of friendship' for U.S. and Britain

Posted Jun 21, 2009 by Michael Krebs
Iranian President Ahmadinejad counters remarks by U.S. President Obama and by other Western powers, saying that 'they will not be placed in the circle of friendship with the Iranian nation.'
Anti Ahmadinejad rally in Iran
Mousavi supporters in Tehran, during the Iranian presidential election 2009 campaign
Shahram Sharif
As tensions continued to escalate dramatically inside Iran and abroad, Iranian President Ahmadinejad - the man at the center of the disputed Iranian election - called on Western nations, namely the United States and Britain, to refrain from "hasty remarks."
Iranian protesters gathered in Tehran and defied demands to disassemble - facing tear gas, water canons, and police batons on Saturday.
U.S. President Obama, caving to pressure from numerous critics, broke his silence on the matter and urged Iran to not use violence against its own people.
"Definitely by hasty remarks you will not be placed in the circle of friendship with the Iranian nation. Therefore I advise you to correct your interfering stances," the ISNA news agency quoted Ahmadinejad as saying, according to a Fox News report.
"They (Western countries) want to portray as small the great and powerful position that has been created for the Iranian nation inside and outside after the recent election, by which of course they made a mistake and they showed they still do not know the Iranian nation," Ahmadinejad said on Sunday.
Reuters reported that Iranian officials will announce the results of their investigation on complaints surrounding the questionable election results. The announcement is expected to come at the end of this week.
According to Fox News, Foreign Minister Manoucher Mottaki said the "possibility of organized and comprehensive disruption and irregularities in the election ... is almost close to zero."
Mottaki criticized Britain, France and Germany questioning Ahmadinejad's victory and the nature of democracy in Iran. Mottaki said France was taking "treacherous and unjust approaches" and said Britain "has always created problems" in relations.