http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/222922

No Remaining Hope For Utah Miners

Posted Sep 2, 2007 by KJ Mullins
After the seventh borehole was observed it has been decided that there is no possible way that the six trapped miners in Utah could still be alive. The oxygen levels in the mine are too low to sustain life.
File photo: A continuous longwall miner in an underground coal mine in Utah.
File photo: A continuous longwall miner in an underground coal mine in Utah.
U.S. Government photo
"Over the past 25 days, the Mine Safety and Health Administration has exhausted all known options in our attempt to reach the six miners," Richard Stickler, head of the agency, said in a statement.
"The thoughts and prayers of the dedicated professionals at MSHA are with the families."
The president of the mine Bob Murray was not present Friday when federal officials made the announcement that the rescue effort was being stopped. The miners bodies will remain inside as it is too dangerous to send in crews to retrieve their bodies. They have been identified as Luis Hernandez, Manuel Sanchez, Kerry Allred, Carlos Payan, Brandon Phillips and Don Erickson.
The White Hose sent word to the families as their hopes were dashed completely.
"Last night, a difficult decision was made to end the search," President Bush said in a statement. "Laura and I are deeply saddened by this tragedy and continue to pray for the families of these men."
Labor Secretary Elaine Chao called the ordeal "heartbreaking."
"The grueling around-the-clock rescue operation that claimed three lives and injured six others has also taken a tremendous toll on the many brave rescuers and the local community, and our thoughts and prayers are with them all," Chao said in a statement.
Friday's announcement was expected. Three had died during the rescue efforts when a mountain bump had caused another collapse.
"We basically told the families that at this point in time we've run out of options," Stickler said at a news conference late Friday.
"We've consulted with the people that we have here, we've consulted with the technical support in Pittsburgh and we've consulted with private consultants in terms of where we can go," he said.
"And basically, through all the information we've gleaned over the past nearly four weeks in terms of the conditions we found, in terms of the air readings we found down there and ... everything else, we just don't know where else we can put a hole to get any other information."
Bob Murray has already started the paperwork to close and seal the mine.
"I will never come back to that evil mountain," he said.