Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.
Press Release

Survey shows Canadians value sustainability and air quality at home but few take action

Canada NewsWire

British Columbians most likely to choose sustainable and green building products; Albertans the least

MONTREAL, TORONTO, CALGARY, VANCOUVER, March 31 /CNW/ - The LePage Report on Canadians' Attitudes to Sustainability, released today, reveals that while an overwhelming majority of Canadian homeowners view indoor air quality and using sustainable and green building products as important, only half are aware of products to improve indoor air quality and only one in five use green and sustainable building products.

"It is clear that Canadians value sustainability and indoor air quality," said Michael Terhardt, Marketing Director for LePage® brand adhesives and sealants. "While the vast majority of Canadians are turning to the Internet or home retailers for information on these important subjects, it is clear more work is required to educate homeowners and increase awareness of how to achieve these valued outcomes."

The report showed that British Columbians lead Canada in adoption of environmentally sustainable building products and in knowledge of products that contribute to indoor air quality, followed by those in Ontario and Quebec.  Albertans lag behind in adoption of environmentally sustainable products and overall in following sustainable practices in the home.

The LePage Report also illustrated that Canadian women are more likely to follow sustainable practices in the home than men. For instance, women are more likely than men to recycle, compost, choose organic household products and choose organic local food. However, Marcelo Orchon, Sr. Brand Manager at LePage pointed out that, "Despite significantly more women than men viewing the use of environmentally sustainable building products as important, there is no difference in their adoption."

In addition to gender playing a role in the level of importance, age is also a key factor in selecting green and sustainable building products. Orchon notes, "The survey revealed that Canadian homeowners aged 55+ are more likely to use these products than younger respondents."

Of those who were aware of products that contribute to indoor air quality, Canadians pointed to heating and ventilation systems, low VOC building construction materials, and bamboo and cork flooring as top examples. For green and sustainable building products, Canadians listed building construction materials, environmentally friendly non-toxic and low emission materials, renewable resources, recyclable materials, and energy efficient products, although those  in Quebec were the least likely to think of energy efficient products.

With half of Canadians planning minor repairs or painting in the next 6 months, nearly two-thirds using professional help don't plan to ask for sustainable and green building products in home renovation projects.

Conducted by Vision Critical with over 1000 Canadian homeowners, The LePage Report on Canadian's Attitudes to Sustainability coincides with LePage Lends a Hand Month, in which LePage will donate green and sustainable building products to Habitat for Humanity Canada. "We're helping support their goal to have 90 per cent of their builds meet third-party, best-in-class green building standards by 2012," said Terhardt.

Other key findings from the report include:

  • An overwhelming majority of Canadian homeowners view home air quality (98%) and using sustainable and green building products (75%) as important. Women (76%) and those aged 55+ (82%) find home air quality very important.

  • Regardless of importance, only half (49%) of Canadian homeowners are aware of products to improve home air.

  • One in five Canadian homeowners use sustainable and green renovation / building products. British Columbian homeowners (27%) are the most likely to use sustainable and green renovation / building products and those in Alberta (15%) the least likely.

  • Nearly all Canadian homeowners that look for sustainable / green products view performance (99%), price (97%), and product (92%) as important.

  • Despite the perceived importance of sustainable and green building products, nearly two thirds (65%) of Canadian homeowners who have used professional help have not asked them to use sustainable and green building products in home renovation projects. One third (33%) have never asked for professional help for their home - of which the majority (54%) are not sure if they would ask a professional to use these products.

  • Follow Sustainable Practices in Home:
    • 96% recycle (99% BC, 86% AB, 99% Ontario, 97% Quebec) Condo owners less likely at 93%
    • 46% composting (50% BC, 33% AB, 54% Ontario, 31% Quebec) Condo owners less likely at 16%
    • 69% energy efficient appliances  (74% BC, 72% AB, 85% Ontario, 38% Quebec)
    • 36% organic, local food  (48% BC, 28% AB,  37% Ontario, 31% Quebec)
    • 20% using sustainable and green renovation, building products (27% BC, 15% AB, 20% Ontario, 19% Quebec)

Methodology:

From January 20 to January 24, 2010, Angus Reid Public Opinion conducted an online survey among a sample of 1,006 adult Canadian homeowners who are Angus Reid Forum panel members. The margin of error—which measures sampling variability—is +/- 3.0%. The results have been statistically weighted to ensure a representative sample. Discrepancies in or between totals are due to rounding.

Latest News
Top News

Corporate

Help & Support

News Links

copyright © 2014 digitaljournal.com   |   powered by dell servers