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article imageU.S. to promote coal as a solution to climate change at COP23

By Karen Graham     Nov 5, 2017 in World
Bonn - A major UN meeting, officially known as the COP23, begins on Monday in Bonn, Germany. However, plans by the Trump administration to promote coal as a solution to climate change has angered many who will be attending the climate meeting.
The White House confirmed on Thursday it was sending a delegation of "negotiators" to the UN climate meeting, scheduled to last for two weeks. In June, Trump announced the U.S. was pulling out of the 2015 Paris Climate Accord but under the rules, the U.S. cannot leave the agreement until 2020.
It has also been learned, according to the BBC, that the White House is also supporting an event to promote fossil fuels and nuclear power, headed up by speakers from coal giant Peabody Energy and others. The plan is to show how coal and other fossil fuels can help in curbing the impacts of rising temperatures.
In a statement, a White House spokesman said the presentation and discussion will build on the administration's attempts to promote fossil fuels at the G20 meeting that was held in July this year.
"It is undeniable that fossil fuels will be used for the foreseeable future, and it is in everyone's interest that they be efficient and clean," the spokesman said.
Few people living in America today will remember how it was in the 1940s. This is an image of a wart...
Few people living in America today will remember how it was in the 1940s. This is an image of a wartime production plant. LOC - CALL NUMBER LC-USW36-376, reproduction number LC-DIG-fsac-1a35072.
Library of Congress
The absurdity of the claims
The Trump program, entitled “The Role of Cleaner and More Efficient Fossil Fuels and Nuclear Power in Climate Mitigation,” will also feature NuScale Power, a nuclear engineering firm; and Tellurian, a liquefied natural gas exporter besides Peabody Coal.
“As the world seeks to reduce emissions while promoting economic prosperity, fossil fuels will continue to play a central role in the energy mix,” a preview of the Nov. 13 presentation says, reports the New York Times.
Barry K. Worthington, executive director of the United States Energy Association, will also be a speaker, and he says he plans to "deliver a dose of reality" to a forum dominated by activists demanding an end to coal, oil, and gas. Worthington argues there are “no credible projections” showing fossil fuels will meet less than 40 percent of global energy demand by 2050.
Activists of Greenpeace have painted 'No Coal No Trump' on the side of the 'SBI Subar...
Activists of Greenpeace have painted 'No Coal No Trump' on the side of the 'SBI Subaru' ship with some 60,000 tons of coal from Texas on board in Hamburg, nothern Germany on June 1, 2017
Bodo Marks, dpa/AFP
Worthington says his message to the delegates will be a “horrible experience” but it is important for many to hear. “The reality of it is the world is going to continue to use fossil fuels,’’ he said, “and if I can throw myself on the hand grenade to help people realize that, I’m willing to do it.”
“This discussion is a follow-up to the Administration’s success at the G20, where the United States expressed its support for helping countries meet their climate objectives through the use of cleaner and more efficient fossil fuels and other clean energy sources and technologies,” White House spokesman Raj Shah, said in a statement.
“It is undeniable that fossil fuels will be used for the foreseeable future, and it is in everyone’s interest that they be efficient and clean. Through innovation, the United States continues to be a global leader in cutting carbon emissions.”
Peabody Energy s Bucyrus Erie 3850-B Power Shovel named  Big Hog  working at the company s Sinclair ...
Peabody Energy's Bucyrus Erie 3850-B Power Shovel named "Big Hog" working at the company's Sinclair Surface Mine in 2010.
Peabody Energy Corp.
Anger and dismay over U.S. promotion of fossil fuels
In addition to a number of lawmakers voicing their distaste for the White House stunt, critics worldwide are calling it a "poke in the eye of the international community."
Saleemul Huq, director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development in Bangladesh, says fossil fuels are hurting, not helping the world's poorest countries.
“Any country or company continuing to champion further exploration for and mining of coal and even other fossil fuels from now on would be willfully carrying out a crime against humanity, and they would be held accountable,” he said.
More about Climate talks, Trump administration, Coal, war on science, Bonn Germany