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article imageOp-Ed: Canada's foreign policy is making us less safe

By Andrew Moran     Mar 20, 2015 in Politics
Ottawa - This week, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced that he was going to put forward legislation to extend the nation's role in Iraq and potentially expand its mission into Syria. This will only make us less safe and less free.
This week, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced that he was going to put forward legislation to extend the nation's role in Iraq and potentially expand its mission into Syria. This will only make us less safe.
After a decade-long war in Afghanistan, Canada's military will persist in fighting an unknown enemy in Iraq, Syria and perhaps elsewhere in the Middle East. After spending a large penny on removing Muammar Gadhafi in Libya, we’re now forced to pay for an unjust and intricate war to satisfy the whims of a few, including the prime minister.
Foreign Affairs Minister Rob Nicholson recently said that the Iraq mission is a matter of "moral clarity." He further urged all political parties to join the Conservatives in supporting this foreign policy. Considering that Justin Trudeau and his Liberals are endorsing Bill C-51, a piece of legislation that erodes our liberty even further in the name of security, it'll be likely that Trudeau will either fully support it or be on the fence.
Meanwhile, New Democratic Party leader Thomas Mulcair confirmed that he is against putting Canadian lives at risk for United States adventurism and a war brought on by Washington's foreign interventions and constant endeavors to slay dragons.
Why should Canada involve itself in such a battle with a faceless enemy? Remember, the U.S. is and its allies were the ones to establish ISIS as part of the Syrian rebel initiative to take out the Mossad regime. These Syrian rebels have been trained by U.S. personnel. Moreover, the U.S. is the entity that is currently funding al-Qaeda - in 2013, the U.S. funneled $165 million to the terrorist group.
This is on record, and even U.S. General Wesley Clark conceded this fact on CNN last month.
Canada's commitment to these foreign invasions only places the entire country — from Vancouver to Toronto, from Montreal to St. John's — in further danger. Ottawa terrorist shooter Michael Zehaf-Bibeau even explained in a video prior to the shooting that the government's joint occupation of Afghanistan, Libya and other Muslim lands is making a once peaceful nation the enemy to millions of people worldwide.
In other words, Canada is experiencing blowback from its foreign entanglements.
Indeed, Canadians aren't at fault. However, it's imperative to understand the motive of these criminals and terrorists: what drives so many people to go on Kamikaze missions in all different parts of the world? Answering these types of questions is important to this geopolitical chess game; but thinking about how unstable this is it's more likely Hungry Hungry Hippos.
Zehaf-Bibeau and Toronto terrorist sympathizer Jahanzeb Malik aren't attacking the Consulate General of Jamaica in Toronto or the Russian embassy in Ottawa. They are honing in on those countries and governments that have killed an astronomical amount of Muslim men, women and children.
Remember, other terrorists, including Osama bin Laden, attacked the U.S. because of its foreign policy. These extremists aren't attacking Canada, the U.S. and Great Britain because we're all (supposedly) prosperous and free. It's this government's decision to follow every whim of the Obama administration and that is putting this country at risk.
The only threat to our national security is holding hands with the U.S. administration and combating an enemy that is one day our ally and then the next day our adversary. Canada should focus on its domestic problems before it starts creating a 100-year foreign crusade of seeking out enemies.
How about Canada's massive national debt that needs some fixing?
This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
More about canada foreign policy, Stephen Harper, thomas mulcair, Iraq, Isis
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