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article imageHalloween has nothing on the world's real-life creatures

By Karen Graham     Oct 30, 2014 in Odd News
Halloween is a time to celebrate all that is mysterious and magical. It is the one night of the year where our imaginations are allowed to run wild and free, and vampires, zombies and bloodsuckers roam the darkened streets.
But did you know that in the real world, there are creatures straight out of the scariest of Halloween tales. From grotesque-looking sea creatures, to vampire bats and zombie ants, these creatures don't need a costume or a Hollywood special effects artist to create their looks because they are for real. Chances are good that most of us will never come up on many of these creatures, but just knowing they exist is "spooky."
Vampire Bats
Vampire bats drink the blood of warm-blooded animals.They are also known to carry rabies.
Vampire bats drink the blood of warm-blooded animals.They are also known to carry rabies.
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There are only three species of bats that feed on blood, and they are all native to the Americas. They range from Mexico to Brazil, Chile and Argentina. While they have been firmly entrenched in Western vampire lore, vampire bats usually feed on birds and livestock, and only one, the common vampire bat, feeds on the ground.
Goblin Sharks
Head of a goblin shark (Mitsukurina owstoni) with jaws extended.
Head of a goblin shark (Mitsukurina owstoni) with jaws extended.
Dianne Bray / Museum Victoria
While scary to encounter, the goblin shark is actually a little-understood creature of the ocean depths. It is considered a "living fossil," the only representative of a family of sharks that date back 125 million years. Luckily for most people going to the beach, they will never encounter a goblin shark. They tend to stay at depths below 330 feet.
Wrinkle-face bat
The wrinkle-face bat is a fruit eater  and likes to stay far back in the jungles of Central America....
The wrinkle-face bat is a fruit eater, and likes to stay far back in the jungles of Central America. It, too, is the only member of its species.
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This bat can't help that it looks like a creature out of the "Alien" movies because nature gave him this strange-looking head for a reason. The misshapen head makes it easier for this bat to eat a greater variety of fruits. Another strange fact about this bat is that it is not classified as a fruit bat. Instead, it is classified as a leaf-nosed bat. Go figure?
Thorny Dragon of Australia
Thorny Dragon  or Thorny Devil (Moloch horridus). Regardless of its name  it is a scary-looking crea...
Thorny Dragon, or Thorny Devil (Moloch horridus). Regardless of its name, it is a scary-looking creature.
Baras
This devilish looking lizard is native to West-Central Australia, and is the only species in the genus moloch. Thank goodness, as dragons go, it only gets up to about eight inches in length, but it can live up to 20 years. The thorny dragon is covered in sharp, hard spines that make it difficult for predators to grab it. They are also a popular terrarium pet.
Deep sea Dragon fish
The dragon fish  or sea viper is a ferocious-looking creature from the middle depths of the ocean. T...
The dragon fish, or sea viper is a ferocious-looking creature from the middle depths of the ocean. They hunt using a bioluminescent barbel or lure. Those sharp teeth are very real.
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Dragon fish are real predators of the deep. Their overly-large teeth don't really correspond to their body size, though. There are some 67 species of dragon fish, and they can be difficult to tell apart. While most sea creatures are sensitive to blue light, the dragon fish is also sensitive to red light. They can produce a faint red light beam that helps them in hunting their prey.
Venezuelan Poodle Moth
Discovered in 2009 in Venezuela  this poodle moth proves that not all creatures are scary. This one ...
Discovered in 2009 in Venezuela, this poodle moth proves that not all creatures are scary. This one looks sort of cute.
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The Venezuelan poodle moth was first filmed in the wild in 2009. The pictures and video became an instant Internet sensation with people saying the little creature is both cuddly and scary. According to The Week, the fuzzy little fellow has been compared to a cross between "a miniature gargoyle and a Furby" to a weird new "Pokemon character." The truth be known, science knows very little about this moth.
More about real creatures, Vampires, Zombies, reallife, Imagination
 
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