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article imageLynn Canyon Park — Scenic hiking trails amidst a lush rainforest Special

By Igor I. Solar     Oct 8, 2014 in Environment
Vancouver - Lynn Canyon Park in North Vancouver, British Columbia, is part of a luxuriant temperate rainforest. The park contains an informative Ecology Centre, a breathtaking suspension bridge, and several beautiful hiking trails along a pristine river.
During the last decades of the 19th century the conifer forests on the mountains located north of the Burrard Inlet were logged for timber exports to eastern Canada, the United States and Europe. Most of the giant ancient trees (Douglas fir and Pacific red cedar), many as old as 1,000 years, disappeared and were reduced to stumps. Secondary forest growth, favored by moderate temperatures, abundant rainfall, and protective measures, led to the lush vegetation that currently covers the mountains around the Valley of the Lynn River and Lynn Canyon Park in North Vancouver, B.C.
Today, the rainforest that occupies the magnificent canyon of the Lynn River is composed of 80 to 120-year-old trees where the predominant species are again large native conifers with heights that allow the passage of light enabling the growth of dense understory vegetation consisting of shrubs and berry bushes.
The fauna comprises numerous species including Douglas Squirrel (Tamiasciurus douglasii), chestnut-backed chickadee (Poecile rufescens), and Steller's jay (Cyanocitta stelleri). Other animals such as black bears (Ursus americanus) and blacktail deers (Odocoileus hemionus) are also habitants of the area, but are rarely seen by visitors to the park trails.
The Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge spans 48 meters across the canyon and hangs at a height of 50 mete...
The Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge spans 48 meters across the canyon and hangs at a height of 50 meters above the the river.
Upstream view of the Lynn River from the Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge.
Upstream view of the Lynn River from the Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge.
Downstream view of the Lynn River from the Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge.
Downstream view of the Lynn River from the Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge.
Lynn Canyon Park belongs to the District of North Vancouver. In the beginning, it was a small park of 5 hectares donated by private land owners. The park opened in September 1912. Over the years the District of North Vancouver has gradually added adjacent land, so that today the park occupies an area of 617 hectares, making it one of the largest parks of Greater Vancouver.
Boardwalks along the trails provide access to quiet spots to sit a while and enjoy the sights and so...
Boardwalks along the trails provide access to quiet spots to sit a while and enjoy the sights and sounds of nature.
Many of the trails in Lynn Canyon Park are covered with boardwalks which makes strolling in the fore...
Many of the trails in Lynn Canyon Park are covered with boardwalks which makes strolling in the forest easy for people of all ages.
Evidence of former logging operations in the forest. A young tree  part of the secondary forestation...
Evidence of former logging operations in the forest. A young tree, part of the secondary forestation, grows atop an old stump.
Besides the beautiful views of the rain forest and numerous waterfalls and lagoons along the steep river, one of the main attractions of the park is the Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge. The bridge is 48 meters long and hangs at a height of 50 meters above the waters of the river. Lynn Canyon Park has an Ecology Centre focusing on the local ecosystem and on educating people about local and global environmental concerns. The Ecology Centre has exhibits on plants, animals and information about the people who lived in the area, the effect of early logging, and how the Park and the Suspension Bridge were developed.
Set in the middle of the forest  the Lynn Canyon Park Ecology Centre provides information on the par...
Set in the middle of the forest, the Lynn Canyon Park Ecology Centre provides information on the park's features and educates visitors on local and global environmental concerns.
NV District
The secondary growth forest allows the passage of light enabling the development of dense understory...
The secondary growth forest allows the passage of light enabling the development of dense understory vegetation consisting of shrubs and berry bushes.
The Park includes two main walking and hiking trails. After crossing the suspension bridge, the trail to the left leads to a large turquoise lagoon known as the 30-foot Pool. Alternatively, one may take the path on the right that leads to the Twin Falls Bride, a beautiful place with two small waterfalls surrounded by rocks amid dense vegetation.
Visiting the Lynn Canyon Park is easy by car or relatively easy using public transportation. Bus line #228 goes to Lynn Valley Centre, from where one may walk about 15 minutes to the park, or transfer to Community Shuttle #227, which goes to the main entrance of Lynn Canyon Park.
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Note: Do not confuse “Lynn Canyon Park and Suspension Bridge” with “Capilano Suspension Bridge” Both are in North Vancouver, but the latter is developed as a tourist attraction and the cost of admission is CAD$ 35. Access to Lynn Canyon Park is free.
More about Lynn Canyon Park, Lynn Canyon Ecology Centre, Lynn River, North Vancouver BC, Temperate rainforest
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