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Top News: Science

Study: Alzheimer's brain shrinkage slowed by Omega 3s, Vitamin B

The authors of a study on Alzheimer's Disease and other dementia presented at a conference last week say they've made a major breakthrough in treating the illness. The study shows vitamins halt the brain shrinkage that leads to memory loss.

How Europeans became white-skinned

The mystery of why dark-skinned peoples, who migrated north from Africa, became white-skinned Europeans may have been solved.

Anxiety linked to continual experiences of déjà vu

Frequent experience of déjà vu and anxiety related to university life coupled with unfortunate experimentation with LSD make a young man's life a continual time-loop of seemingly relived events, a condition newly described as psychogenic déjà vu.

Longest-running wolf study is running out of wolves

A predator-prey study started 57 years ago will have to end, or possibly shift direction next year because the wolves being studied are nearly extinct. The population of predators on Isle Royale is down to three lone wolves.

HIV antibody therapy shows success

A new study has revealed that delivering antibodies to HIV-infected people can lower levels of the virus. This offers hope as a new treatment for those infected with the virus.

How many recessive lethal mutations do we carry?

Scientists report an estimate of the average number of recessive lethal mutations people carry. The figures are quite surprising.

East Asia traded with New World 1,000 years before Columbus

Artifacts found in Alaska confirm that East Asians from China, Korea and Yakutia traded with North Americans a thousand years before Columbus arrived.

Can our metabolism change our memory?

New York - Fruit flies learn and remember a preference for lower-calorie typical lab nutrition over high-calorie food, according to a new study.

Japan's population falls for fourth straight year

On Friday the Japanese Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications released the latest figures on the country's natural population decline, and for the very first time, the natural decline topped 250,000.

Should an experimental ALS drug be made available?

Biotech company Genervon has requested accelerated approval for its experimental ALS drug after a small but promising Phase 2 clinical trial. Will drug authorities allow its use?

Like breeds with like in animal study

Paris - As indication in a new laboratory study, mice pairs with similar anxiety levels produce offspring more quickly than coupled animals with differing personalities.

Improved crime scene forensics with fungal DNA

New York - Scientists have come up with a computer model indicating where a dust sample came from within the U.S. This is based on the DNA of fungi found in the sample.

New theory raises possibility Julius Caesar suffered mini-strokes

London - Julius Caesar is considered one of the world's greatest military leaders, his conquests at times audacious in their planning. But besides studying his victories, historians and medical scientists have long debated his health history.

Stone Age man was a cannibal say archeologists

Stone Age diets have become all the rage recently, but they seem to have left out one key ingredient from the food list — human flesh.

Last male white rhino on Earth guarded by armed men 24/7

The last endangered white rhino on Earth is currently being guarded constantly by four armed rangers. It is their hope to aid the rhino in mating before the animal becomes extinct.

Op-Ed: 'Cloning the woolly mammoth' — A documentary

A recent documentary by Motherboard looks into the murky world of mammoth cloning. Focusing on the efforts of a company in South Korea, it poses the question of whether this is truly the advancement of science or just big business?

NYC to finally recognize It was home to a slave market

New York - Most people think of slavery and slave markets as being peculiar to our Southern states and being strictly a "Southern crime against humanity." But New Yorkers are finally going to have to acknowledge their own role in the trade in human beings.

Newly discovered fossil sheds light on fearsome terror bird clan

For more than 60 million years, enormous predatory birds, often called "terror birds" dominated South America. Now, a recent find of a previously unknown species in Argentina sheds light on how these birds vocalized — and possibly hunted their prey.

Mystery deepens over light spots on surface of dwarf planet Ceres

The mystery of the two strange light spots on the surface of the dwarf planet Ceres has deepened. New infrared images from the Dawn space craft are giving contradictory information, which has left scientists baffled.
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