Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.
Top News: Science

Using cancer-fighting drugs against malaria

Scientists have identified a several compounds that may lead to different ways to fight the malaria. Specifically, a university team has identified 31 enzyme-blocking molecules that could halt malaria before symptoms start.

Primary European MRSA strain originated in Africa

Copenhagen - The primary type of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infecting people in Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa, is derived from a single sub-Saharan ancestor, according to a new study.

Fingerprinting helps to tell different cancers apart

Most cancers have a specific signature that arises from significant changes to the a marker called the epigenome. This is a type of "genetic fingerprint." Interpreting this could result in cancers being identified and treated faster.

Yellowstone earthquake threat much larger than estimated

The threat of Yellowstone's earthquake is much larger than previously estimated. Recent seismic activity helped the U.S. Geological Survey Team reach this alarming discovery.

Botox could treat cancer

New York - Botox, used in millions of face-smoothing procedures by the rich and vain, might also be a new weapon in the fight against cancer, according to a new study.

Hover bikes soon to be a reality

In the future flying machines would replace the automobile our teachers once told us. That prediction has just become a reality. The first hover bike is now making headlines for being the first of many hover machines being produced for the mass market.

Yeast used to make morphine

Biologists have successfully introduced bacterial and poppy plant genes into yeast to manufacture morphine. The research is important because opiates are medically essential. However, current production via opium poppy leads to supply inefficiencies.

Chimps use eyes to show empathy

Amsterdam - New research suggests that Chimpanzees may reinforce social bonds with each other by involuntarily mimicking a fellow chimp’s pupil size.

Animal welfare groups raise concerns over laboratory animals

A strongly worded report from an animal rights group states that many accredited laboratories violate animal welfare rules, and that the mistreatment cases are generally more often than with non-accredited facilities.

Altering neurons improves autism in mice

Fixing impaired neurons appears to ease the symptoms of autism in laboratory studies on mice, where mice have the disorder. This is according to a new study published in the journal Neuron.

Surgical studies are biased against using women

An analysis of papers published in several surgical journals has revealed an overwhelming reliance on male subjects and male-derived cells, and consequently less female subjects or female cell lines are used.

Ancient DNA shows Inuit were not the first to settle the Arctic

The first people to enter into North America's Arctic were a very shy people who didn't intermix with their neighbors. More importantly, anthropologists now say that DNA studies show that Inuit and Native Americans are genetically separate from them.

New findings into an alcohol dependence gene

Scientists have linked a gene, already identified with alcohol dependence, with a neurotransmitter involved in anxiety and relaxation.

Raising fish to walk on land

Researchers have turned to a living fish, called Polypterus, into a fish that can walk on land. This was carried out in order to see what might have happened when fish first attempted to walk out of the water.

Botanists fight to save world's oldest living plant

Botanists in Australia are attempting to save the King's Holly, considered the world's oldest living plant. Lomatia tasmanica is found in only one place in the world, hanging on to life in a secluded location of South-West Tasmnia's Wilderness area.

Tomatoes linked with fighting cancer

A new study suggests that eating tomatoes may lower the risk of prostate cancer. The research shows that men who consume more than 10 portions of tomatoes each week reduce their risk by about 20 percent.

First evidence of water discovered outside Solar System in clouds

The first evidence of water outside our Solar System has been found 7.3 light-years from Earth in ice clouds on a brown dwarf star.

Death Valley's mysterious 'sailing stones' a mystery no longer

Death Valley - Sometimes a mysterious event is all the more fun knowing about when it remains unsolved. Such is the case with the sailing stones of Death Valley, California. For almost a century, the tracks of these stones have been studied, but now, we have an answer.

Op-Ed: Mars One asks, ‘Is a one-way journey to Mars insane?’

Sydney - Slightly belated as it may seem, this question is part of a bit of soul-searching on the part of Mars One, the first commercial-only one-way trip to Mars. One of the questions they asked was “Is a one-way mission insane?”
  1 2 3 4 Next»
RSS RSS for
Top News: Science
Post news and get paid»
Latest News
Top News
Engage

Corporate

Help & Support

News Links

copyright © 2014 digitaljournal.com   |   powered by dell servers