Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.
Top News: Science

Studying the eyes of fruit flies to fight cancer

Mutations in the human retinoblastoma protein can cause a form of eye cancer. To try and understand what is going on at the genetic level, researchers have begun studies in fruit flies.

Microscopic bumps could repel hospital superbugs

New research suggests that coating surfaces in hospitals with microscopic bumps and ridges could repel hospital superbugs (or at least prevent their attachment).

Op-Ed: Is modern society less evolved than chimps for fairness? Yes

Atlanta - If there’s one thing which annoys everyone, it’s unfairness, as applied to themselves. A new theory, that the sense of fairness evolved to promote cooperation, has now had some confirmation through a new study. It also raises a few questions.

Old and new aerospace firms win NASA contract for 'space taxi'

Cape Canaveral - Boeing and SpaceX have been chosen for nearly $7 billion in U.S. funding to develop a commercial space capsule to bring astronauts to the international space station.

The incredible life of the African midge

Biologists have completed the genetic analysis on the African midge. The remarkable insect can survive a variety of extreme conditions. The basis of this “invulnerability” is the insect’s genes.

Studying flatworms to fight infections in people

Scientists are studying the way that flatworms defend themselves against bacteria in order to understand more about the way that the human body deals (or fails to deal with) pathogenic infection.

Tackling piglet parasites

Biologists have examined a parasitic disease that affects piglets during the first days of their life and can cause heavy diarrhea in the animals. To find out more, the researchers analyzed the immune response to the infection.

You're attracted to the smell of those with same politics

According to a new study published in the American Journal of Political Science, people are attracted to the body odor of others with similar political beliefs.

Hemp batteries could be a reality

Researchers have found a way to boost the energy density of supercapacitors through the use of more sophisticated electrodes. These electrodes are composed of hemp fibers, and they have a high energy storage capacity.

FDA approves new melanoma drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first of a new type of immunotherapy that aims to direct a patient’s own immune system against the body's cancer.

Stem cell study for eye disease

Kobe - Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology will shortly treat the first patient in using a stem cell-based treatment for age-related macular degeneration.

IBM’s Watson to compute clinical trials

IBM’s cognitive computer has a new task for its massive "brain". The computer will be individualizing trial plans for cancer patients at the Mayo Clinic.

Op-Ed: The patent gene debate: who owns your genes?

The Federal Court of Australia has rejected an appeal of a ruling that allows companies to patent isolated human genes. This reignites the debate: who owns your genes - you or the company that extracts them?

Enterovirus spreading among U.S. children

A previously rare respiratory virus is landing hundreds of children in hospitals across the U.S. Worryingly, it is unknown why the virus seems to only cause severe illness in children.

Pilot study for infants with autism

A new trial has found that teaching parents certain therapeutic interactions for babies showing early signs of autism may improve the infants’ future social development.

Pioneering scientist scoops Lemelson-MIT Prize

Sangeeta Bhatia, creator of miniature medical technologies, has won the Lemelson-MIT Prize. Bhatia is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and a professor at MIT, where she directs the Laboratory for Multiscale Regenerative Technologies.

Latest genome sequencing research

Scientists continue to make advances with genome sequencing. Digital Journal has reviewed the latest research and some of the new creatures to be typed and categorized.

Paleontologists discover pterosaur that resembles 'Avatar' beast

Paleontologists have discovered fossils of a 120 million-year-old pterosaur that bears a striking resemblance to a winged creature in James Cameron's movie 'Avatar.' Unearthed in China, the pterosaur also bears a pouch similar to a pelican's.

Bacteria could be used to 'eat nuclear waste'

Manchester - Researchers have unearthed microbes, found living underground, that could help tackle the problem of nuclear waste disposal. The bacteria can survive in the very harsh conditions found in radioactive waste disposal sites.
  1 2 3 4 Next»
RSS RSS for
Top News: Science
Post news and get paid»

Corporate

Help & Support

News Links

copyright © 2014 digitaljournal.com   |   powered by dell servers