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Top News: Science

U.S. halts research on the word's deadliest pathogens

Washington - Following a series of biosafety errors at federal research facilities, the U.S. government has temporarily halted funding for new studies into serious pathogens like influenza, SARS, and MERS viruses.

Keeping rice arsenic free

Scientists have identified a transporter protein in rice that shifts arsenic in to vacuoles. This mechanism helps to prevent the toxic element from traveling into grains.

Microbes used to detox marine pollutants

Manchester - Many microbes have an ability to "clean up" pollutants. A new study has shown how special cellular chemistry allows microbes to strip pollutants of halogen atoms. The finding could be useful for tackling marine toxins.

Oldest human genome sequenced

A 45,000-year-old bone has been sequenced. This is the oldest human genome yet to have been sequenced. The bone came from a leg bone preserved in Siberia.

Can electromagnets 're-program' cells?

Scientists have reported that electromagnetic exposure facilitates cell reprogramming. Not all scientists are convinced.

Brain patterns help to detect conciousness

Scientists have identified brain activity patterns that appear to indicate when an unresponsive patient is conscious. The finding helps to characterize brain activity patterns that can identify signs of awareness in seemingly vegetative patients.

Breast cancer rates lower among Latina women

A genome-wide association study has identified that a specific gene could help explain the relatively low rates of breast cancer among Latina women.

Easter Islanders also made voyages to the New World

Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, is one of the world's most remote inhabited islands. The closest continental land mass is Chile, 2,182 miles away. Yet, science has proven the Rapa Nui people met with early South Americans, well before Europeans came visiting.

Lab creates coldest air in the universe

A laboratory has created the coldest cubic meter in the universe. The air was developed in Italy and was verified using instruments designed by Yale University.

Doctors treating more drug-resistant patients: Study

More patients in the U.S. are coming down with drug-resistant bacterial infections because of overuse and over-prescription of antibiotics in humans and animals.

Black holes acting as stopcocks shutting off new star formation

Baltimore - Massive black holes at the centre of older galaxies operate as a brake on the formation of new stars, a study has found.

Plant grown treatment for pulmonary hypertension

People suffering with pulmonary hypertension have few treatment options. However, a novel therapy, that has been trialled in animals, has the potential to be an effective therapy.

Notebook found in Antarctica is an unexpected treasure to science Special

Christchurch - While some speculate there might be diamonds in the Kimberlite rock found in some of the mountains of Antarctica, conservation teams at the Antarctic Heritage Trust of New Zealand continue to uncover rare treasures of their own.

Study: Shape of person's face indication of aggression, dominance

Researchers in the United Kingdom have found that the shape of a person's face can determine how domineering and aggressive they are.

Solar flares might increase, disrupting communication

Communications on Earth might be disrupted and Northern Lights could intensify if solar flares increase as some scientists expect.

Two families of comets found orbiting nearby star

Paris - Such has been the huge advances in the field of space telescopes in recent years that astronomers are now turning their attention to comets in orbit around stars other than our Sun.

Paralyzed man walks again

A remarkable story: a paralyzed Bulgarian man called Darek Fidyka is walking again after novel treatment by doctors. The treatment consisted of implanted regenerative cells.

Computer design helps build new antibiotics

Technologists and biologists have combined resources to use computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics. This combination approach could lead to the development of a new generation of drugs.

Not just sci-fi, long-range tractor beam now a reality

Canberra - Two Australian laser physicists have developed the world's first first long-distance optical tractor beam, capable of not only attracting objects, but repelling them as well.
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