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Top News: Science

Cave fish cast light on the causes of obesity

Scientists have been studying blind cavefish to understand the effects of obesity. The results from the fish, for patterns of starvation and over-eating, are thought to be similar as those with the human body.

How opium poppies process morphine revealed for the first time

The process by which a poppy encodes enzymes to make morphine has been discovered. This relates to a specific gene. This could lead to alternative ways to produce the drug.

Could there be life on the amazing and mysterious Pluto?

The data coming in from the New Horizons spacecraft's mission to Pluto proves that the Universe is, if nothing else, full of surprises.

Bone-like material makes for improved medical devices

Scientists have created an approach for fitting medical devices in a better way with biological systems. For this the researchers were inspired by the way bone interfaces with tissues in the human body.

Super carbon filters play music in the heat

Detroit - Technologists have developed a carbon nanotube transducer with a special property: the device makes sounds, and plays music, with heat. The device is also light weight and portable.

NASA confirms discovery of exoplanet 21 light years away

Pasadena - NASA announced in a press release on July 30th that they had found the closest rocky planet outside our solar system. It's only 21 light years away.

Battling HIV with novel cancer drug

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) can be "flushed out" from hiding places in the human body by using a drug normally used to treat cancer, according to a new study.

First discoveries from Philae comet lander released

The first wave of data from comet lander Philae came out on Thursday, revealing a trove of new information about the comet's composition.

Prostate cancer, five different types found

Cambridge - Challenging the assumption that prostate cancer is one type of the disease, researchers have identified five different types, each of which has a distinct genetic signature.

Finding a needle in a hay stack just became easier

The detection of metal contaminates in our food supply is important to our health and safety, but existing methods of inspection are limited. However, researchers at Toyohashi University Of Technology may have solved that problem.

Rocket could defy laws of physics, fly to moon in 4 hours

German scientists have confirmed that the so-called "EMDrive" rocket created by NASA could defy the known laws of physics and be capable of flying to the moon in just four hours.

Ancient anoles resemble common lizards of today

Lizards from the Caribbean, preserved for 20 million years in amber, have been found to be identical to their modern relatives, say researchers.

T. rex and cousins had uniquely serrated teeth, scientists find

For some time, scientists have known that Tyrannosaurus rex and other theropod dinosaurs had serrated teeth. They knew that those teeth, with their jagged edges worked like steak knives to help their owner tear through flesh.

Flat pack batteries offer improved performance

Sydney - For wearable tech to become more user-friendly in terms of ease of use, the power source must be flatter. This is what a science group is proposing — a flat pack battery, and one with good power capacity too.

Studying ants for clues about ultra-fine cleaning

Blue-sky thinking researchers have taken inspiration from the way that ants clean to develop improved procedures for nanotechnology. The ants studied are located in Borneo, Indonesia.

Research reveals T.Rex had unique serrated teeth

Research at the University of Toronto has found that Theropods, the species of dinosaur home to T.Rex, had unique teeth structures that underlined their predatory dominance.

Moth eyes provide clues for next-gen solar cells

Researchers have been inspired by the eyes of moths to develop a next generation series of solar power cells. The focus has been with creating a special type of anti-reflective surface.

Clues in the ruins where Britain's empire was born

Washington - Archaeologists have identified the remains of four men who were among the leaders of an early English settlement in Virginia's Jamestown.

Op-Ed: An aging Ant-Man and the science of senolytics Special

Ant-man's main claim to fame is keeping his normal human strength when shrunk to the size of an ant. But while he's fighting ant-sized villains he's also fighting the passage of time. How fast does Ant-Man age?
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