Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
    Log in with Twitter

article imageTigre — History, art and nature in the growing Paraná River Delta Special

By Igor I. Solar     May 26, 2014 in Travel
Tigre - The town of Tigre is located on an island of the Tigre River, one of the branches in the lower delta of the great Paraná River, a major tributary of the "Río de La Plata." The location is an important recreation area for residents of Buenos Aires.
With an extent of 17,500 square kilometers and a length of 320 km, the Paraná River Delta is one of the largest deltas in the world. Unlike other deltas that flow directly into the sea, the Paraná Delta is the only one in the world that empties into a freshwater estuary, the Rio de la Plata, not far from the mouth of the Uruguay River.
The Paraná River flows along three countries: Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina. In its lower course, the Paraná River splits into numerous branches. These include the Luján, Sarmiento and Tigre Rivers, plus many smaller canals and streams forming a multitude of sedimentary islands covered by forests and grasslands.
The boats offer shuttle service to the inhabitants of the islands of the Paraná Delta and tours to ...
The boats offer shuttle service to the inhabitants of the islands of the Paraná Delta and tours to visitors.
Life in Tigre
The city of Tigre lies about 34 kilometers northwest of Buenos Aires. It has about 32 thousand inhabitants. Of these, about 6000 live in houses on the islands of the delta. School kids are picked up from their homes by a municipal boat, taken to public schools at various locations in the delta, and brought back home later in the day. Residents of the delta travel by boat to various churches on the islands to attend religious services on Sunday. Drinking water and groceries are home-delivered by a supermarket-boat.
Tigre River Boats  Terminal (Estación Fluvial). From the Tigre River Station boats and catamarans o...
Tigre River Boats' Terminal (Estación Fluvial). From the Tigre River Station boats and catamarans operate different routes within the Paraná River Delta.
The boats offer shuttle service to the inhabitants of the islands of the Paraná Delta and tours to ...
The boats offer shuttle service to the inhabitants of the islands of the Paraná Delta and tours to visitors.
The name of the area comes from the South American tiger (Panthera onca; Spanish “Tigre” or “Yacareté”). The yacareté is a large feline which was a common resident of the islands in the early twentieth century. When wealthy residents of Buenos Aires began to populate and build summer houses on the islands of the delta, the big cat, known locally as tigre, was deemed a threat to humans and livestock, and was exterminated in the region.
At present, a variety of wild animals still live in the delta. These include the marsh deer, capybaras, otters, several kinds of amphibians, many fish species, and over 200 species of birds.
There are many resort-like Victorian and Tudor mansions in the islands of Tigre. Some houses are bui...
There are many resort-like Victorian and Tudor mansions in the islands of Tigre. Some houses are built on stilts to reduce humidity. This image shows a typical Tigre Delta wood house with a modest pier.
In the midst of lush vegetation in a natural environment of great beauty, the islands of the Tigre River Delta offer numerous attractions for weekend vacations, river navigation, water sports, trekking, bird watching, photography tours, among others. The main historical attractions in the area include the house built by Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (Argentina’s 7th President), and the Art Museum of Tigre.
The Sarmiento House. The small wooden house with a tiled roof on the bank of Sarmiento River is prot...
The Sarmiento House. The small wooden house with a tiled roof on the bank of Sarmiento River is protected under an impressive glass cover to protect it from humidity. In this house lived during the second half of the 19th century Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, president of Argentina (1868-1874). The building houses the Tigre Municipal Library and a historical photographic exhibition of the development of the delta islands. In 1966, Sarmiento’s house was declared a National Historic Monument.
The beautiful building on the banks of the Luján River was built in 1912 for “The Tigre Club”  ...
The beautiful building on the banks of the Luján River was built in 1912 for “The Tigre Club”, a meeting place for the rich and famous. In later years it was used as a Casino and Restaurant. In 1979, the building was declared a National Historic Monument. Since 2006, it houses The Tiger Municipal Museum of Art.
The ever expanding Paraná River Delta
Due to its length (almost 4,900 kilometres) and its abundant flow, the Paraná River carries a lot of sediment. About 160 million tonnes of sediment reach the lower delta every year. Because of this, the delta islands increase and steadily expand downstream towards Buenos Aires at a rate of 80-100 metres per year. Without human intervention to prevent it, the natural growth of the Paraná Delta will continue non-stop. According to estimates, in the next 200 to 500 years, the progress of the Paraná Delta into the Rio de la Plata would extend to the south-central area of the city of Buenos Aires.
Satellite photo of the Río de la Plata seen from northwest to southeast. Tigre and Buenos Aires are...
Satellite photo of the Río de la Plata seen from northwest to southeast. Tigre and Buenos Aires are on the right side near the Paraná River Delta. Sediments from the Paraná and Paraguay Rivers create a plume extending to the vicinity of Montevideo, on the left coast facing the Atlantic Ocean.
NASA
Tigre may be reached from Buenos Aires from Retiro Station, Mitre Line. The train takes about 60 minutes and runs about every 20 minutes. Buses and taxis also travel to Tigre. Tour companies operate half-day and full-day tours to Tigre, including navigation in the delta.
More about Tigre, Tigre Delta, Parana River delta, Buenos aires, Argentina
More news from
Latest News
Top News