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article imageThree in four Brits admit to taking items from hotel rooms Special

By Sam Wright     Jul 4, 2014 in Travel
Three quarters of all British holidaymakers have taken items from hotel rooms home with them, according to recent research by travel website Holiday Hypermarket.
Three quarters of all British holidaymakers have taken items from hotel rooms home with them, according to recent research by travel website Holiday Hypermarket.
“Clearly UK holidaymakers love staying in hotels so much, they feel they want to bring a little bit of their home from home back with them,” says Kay Dixon, general manager of Holiday Hypermarket.
Three quarters of all British holidaymakers have taken items from hotel rooms home with them, according to recent research by travel website Holiday Hypermarket.
“Clearly UK holidaymakers love staying in hotels so much, they feel they want to bring a little bit of their home from home back with them,” says Kay Dixon, general manager of Holiday Hypermarket.
A survey of 1,215 UK consumers by the holiday deals website revealed that 75 percent of freebie-loving Brits have packed items from their room into their suitcases.
Items taken include shower-caps, soap, complimentary tea and coffee, sugar sachets, towels, slippers and bathrobes.
“When people save up for a weekend away, they want to get as much for their money as they can. Keeping the complimentary toiletries makes some people feel like they’ve achieved that,” says Matt Davies, director of travel companies Direct Rail and Direct Ferries. “Again, if people feel like they’ve been ripped off, they’re more likely to take things they’re not supposed to take.”
Kettles, toilet paper, soap-holders and even pot pourri are among the more unusual items Brits admit to bringing home with them.
“I think most people are aware of what they can and can’t take,” says Davies, “but if they resent how much they’re paying for their room, they may be inclined to ‘get even’ in some way — by stealing something useful like a bathrobe, or something more petty like toilet roll.”
15 percent of participants also admitted to pushing the hotel for a free upgrade, and were often successful in their request.
“When it comes to getting upgraded, we know there are some great hoteliers out there who will do whatever they can to give our customers complimentary upgrades to make their stay even more enjoyable,” says Dixon.
It’s unclear if, or how, this could affect the industry. Davies believes this sense of entitlement could do travellers more harm than good. “If it becomes expected — with more and more guests asking for and receiving a complimentary upgrade — we could see a rise in the price of standard rooms,” he speculates. “Or, hotels will go back to refusing upgrades unless guests are willing to pay the difference.”
But, with accommodation often being the most costly part of a trip, can we really blame Brits for trying to get a little more for their money?
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