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article imageSpectacular marine and mountain views at Horseshoe Bay Village Special

By Igor I. Solar     Oct 7, 2014 in Travel
Vancouver - Surrounded by the waters of Howe Sound and the Coast Mountains of British Columbia, the views from Horseshoe Bay Village are truly captivating. There is a park, a marina, a ferry terminal, art galleries, totem poles, and a variety of seafood restaurants
The impressive Lions Gate Bridge crosses the Burrard Inlet from Vancouver’s Stanley Park to the North Shore cities of North Vancouver, on the right side of the northern end of the bridge, and West Vancouver, towards the left. About 20 minutes from the north end of the bridge, on the western end of West Vancouver, is the charming village of Horseshoe Bay.
The 1 823-meters-long Lions Gate Bridge links Vancouver s Stanley Park  across the Burrard Inlet  to...
The 1,823-meters-long Lions Gate Bridge links Vancouver's Stanley Park, across the Burrard Inlet, to the North Shore. The city in the center right is West Vancouver. The village of Horseshoe Bay is a the western end of the city of West Vancouver, at the mouth of Howe Sound.
The village is accessible through a scenic seaside route through the municipality of West Vancouver, or by taking the less attractive, but speedier Upper Levels highway (Highway 1). Horseshoe Bay is at the end of the route which marks the terminus of the Trans-Canada Highway on the British Columbia mainland.
The village of about 1,000 permanent residents is located at the entrance to Howe Sound which is the southern end of the Sea-to-Sky Highway (Hwy 99) to the communities of Lions Bay, Squamish and Pemberton, and the sky resort of Whistler Mountain, a site of the 2010 Winter Olympics. Additionally, Horseshoe Bay is a busy BC Ferries terminal providing vehicle ferry links to Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast, and Bowen Island.
There  is plenty of interesting sights provided by the marina activities and the ferry traffic  with...
There is plenty of interesting sights provided by the marina activities and the ferry traffic, with the impressive Coast Mountains in the background.
Right at the foot of the village is Horseshoe Bay Park. The park is small, about one hectare, but by facing a marina and the ferry terminal, the view is never boring. Beyond the park are the towering Coast Mountains that border Howe Sound. There are places for picnicking, clean waters for beach-combing or quiet sitting along the seashore to watch the boats and ferries coming in and out. There is a fountain with cast-bronze propeller from a converted whaling ship, and as in many places along the BC coast, one will find here the ubiquitous totem poles.
One of the two totem poles decorating Horseshoe Bay Park.
One of the two totem poles decorating Horseshoe Bay Park.
 The Lookout  offers coffee and a fantastic view towards the waters of Horseshoe Bay  the Howe Sound...
"The Lookout" offers coffee and a fantastic view towards the waters of Horseshoe Bay, the Howe Sound, and the Coast Mountains.
Aboriginal people from the Squamish nation were the first occupants of the beautiful bay. They named it "Cha-Hai" which in their language meant “the bay of sizzling waters”. It was at the time when herring were so abundant in the waters of the BC coast that salmon chasing them towards the bay made the water look as it was boiling.
A nice beach not far from the ferry terminal is a good place to watch marine birds and beachcombing.
A nice beach not far from the ferry terminal is a good place to watch marine birds and beachcombing.
Around the 1900s, pioneering families started to move to the area, attracted by the tranquil setting of the bay. The western end of the North Shore was still a dense forest. There was no road and people had to access their homes by boat.
Now, Horseshoe Bay is still a quaint village. The hectic activity of the ferry terminal has not deprived the place of its charm. There are several unique gift shops selling west coast and Haida art, and many restaurants offering seafood options including salmon, halibut and oysters from Vancouver Island.
Horseshoe Bay Village.  The Olive and Anchor  is one of several seafood restaurants in the village f...
Horseshoe Bay Village. "The Olive and Anchor" is one of several seafood restaurants in the village facing the waters of Howe Sound.
Pan-fried oysters are some of the marine delicacies offered at the Village s restaurants.
Pan-fried oysters are some of the marine delicacies offered at the Village's restaurants.
When visiting Vancouver, take a few hours to go to the beautiful seaside village of Horseshoe Bay. It will not disappoint anyone keen on beautiful scenery, west coast art, and delicious seafood.
More about Horseshoe Bay Village, West Vancouver, British columbia, Horseshoe Bay Park, bc ferries
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