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article imageSipping at the Guinness Storehouse, Dublin Special

By Tim Sandle     Nov 28, 2014 in Travel
Dublin - The Guinness Storehouse is one of the highlights of any visit to Dublin, Ireland's vibrant capital city. The Storehouse is rich in history and takes the visitor through centuries of tradition and through to modern times.
Guinness began way back in 1759 when Irishman Arthur Guinness opened the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin. The brewery was operated as a family firm for many years, although it is now part of global brand Diageo. The company is most closely associated with "Guinness", a popular Irish dry stout.
A large copper vessel used in the fermentation process to get the yeast just right for making Guinne...
A large copper vessel used in the fermentation process to get the yeast just right for making Guinness.
A selection of Guinness bottle labels through the years  as found in the Guinness Storehouse.
A selection of Guinness bottle labels through the years, as found in the Guinness Storehouse.
Fans of Guinness, or brewing, or of history should visit the the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin. This is an exhibition, across a number of floors, that traces the history of the popular beverage. The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness.
A selection of barrels  used to hold Guinness over the years.
A selection of barrels, used to hold Guinness over the years.
Since opening in 2000, the exhibition has received over four million visitors.
Part of the Guinness brewing process.
Part of the Guinness brewing process.
The Guinness Storehouse explains the history of Guinness. The story is told through various interactive exhibition areas including ingredients, brewing, transport, cooperage, advertising and sponsorship.
One of the interactive parts of the exhibition is a video on the original Master Cooper Dick Flanagan. This is found alongside a section that focuses on the early history.
An old Victorian brewing sign  from the Guinness brewery tour.
An old Victorian brewing sign, from the Guinness brewery tour.
The exhibition is held in the original spot where Arthur Guinness signed a 9,000-year lease back in 1759.
Part of the Guinness exhibition: a large tank used for brewing. The famous toucan mascot can be seen...
Part of the Guinness exhibition: a large tank used for brewing. The famous toucan mascot can be seen "flying" overhead.
The exhibition is spread across 1.6 hectares and involving an array of audiovisual, interactive displays that cover pretty much all aspects of the brewery's history and the brewing process.
A copper lid from a fermentor  1936.
A copper lid from a fermentor, 1936.
One interesting fact is that, today, annual sales of Guinness total 850 million liters (an astonishing 1.8 billion U.S. pints.)
A large indoor waterfall is used to help to illustrate the brewing process. Guinness originally clai...
A large indoor waterfall is used to help to illustrate the brewing process. Guinness originally claimed only to use water from the river Liffey, which runs through Dublin. Today, purer water is used.
Guinness stout is made from water, barley, roast malt extract, hops, and brewer's yeast. A portion of the barley is roasted to give Guinness its dark color and characteristic taste. Key to the taste of the drink is the burnt flavour that is derived from roasted unmalted barley.
Towards the end of the exhibition, visitors can choose whether to learn how to pull the perfect Guinness pint, or have a free drink in the "Gravity Bar" with 360 degree views over Dublin, or even do both!
A view of Dublin from the top of the Guinness Storehouse  Dublin
A view of Dublin from the top of the Guinness Storehouse, Dublin
The draught beer's thick, creamy head comes from mixing the beer with nitrogen when poured. The company refers to the "perfect pint" of Draught Guinness as the product of a "double pour", which according to the company should take 119.5 seconds.
All of theory is good, but the proof is in the tasting.
Digital Journalist Tim Sandle enjoying a pint of Guinness at the end of the visit.
Digital Journalist Tim Sandle enjoying a pint of Guinness at the end of the visit.
More about Guinness Storehouse, Guinness, Dublin, Ireland
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