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article imagePyramid in Croatia? Secret Dalmatia follows a 1570 map in Zagora

By Paul Bradbury     Mar 12, 2014 in Travel
After the Bosnian pyramid, is there a Croatian equivalent? Secret Dalmatia investigates a map dating back to 1570 in Zagora.
While the traditional association with pyramids is Egypt, the alleged discovery of pyramids in Bosnia and Hercegovina a few years ago brought the possibility of their existence in Europe, and a field trip by boutique agency Secret Dalmatia in Croatia on March 10, 2014 has offered up one more intriguing angle to the mystery.
Specialists in discovering and promoting the many secrets of Croatia and the Dalmatian hinterland, Digital Journal recently reported on how owner Alan Mandic and local adventure specialists Dalmatia Explorer discovered the lost village of Karanovac, and a similar field trip at the weekend investigated a curious feature on a map of the region produced in 1570.
The pyramid
The pyramid
Alan Mandic
Drawn by Martin Kolunic Rota, the map clearly shows what the author calls a pyramid (Colina Pyramide). Poring over modern maps, Mandic decided to investigate.
Zvonik hill near Ostrogašica
Zvonik hill near Ostrogašica
Alan Mandic
"So, it was puzzling why would anyone draw a pyramid on a map… Legend? Folk stories? Something so ancient that no one remembers any more?
"I was thinking about a location near Vrlika, foothill of Dinara. Or something closer to Bosnia?
Zvonik
Zvonik
Alan Mandic
"Recently I was discovering more and more on a very historic area of Nevest and Cera in the very heart of Zagora. The region has gone through dramatic changes through the history and holds some of the most interesting historic sites in the country. What particularly got my attention was the village Ostrogašica that was named after the Ostrogoths that once ruled the area. And then, studying maps, I saw it…"
The walls
The walls
Alan Mandic
Reaching the location, there was evidence of some form of construction, in the shape of a fortress, although this could be explained by the strategic position of the 'pyramid' and commanding views it gives to the surrounding area, pointing perhaps to a later construction. Mandic concludes:
A pit on top of the hill
A pit on top of the hill
Alan Mandic
"So, is it a pyramid? Maybe. I would leave some space for different interpretations but from all the evidences on maps, history, remains of the fortress… I think it is. After hours spent on aerial shots and reading different sources, this makes the most sense."
Steps in the stone
Steps in the stone
Alan Mandic
Pyramid or not, the investigation was just one more example of the untapped beauty and unexplored tourism potential of inland Dalmatia, one of the most interesting and undiscovered areas of Europe, just half an hour from the beach and hit destinations such as the Dalmatian capital of Split.
Martin Kolunić Rota  (c. 1520–1583)
Martin Kolunić Rota (c. 1520–1583)
Alan Mandic
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