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article imageFlight 370 transcript reveals different cockpit chatter

By Nathan Salant     Apr 1, 2014 in Travel
Kuala Lumpur - The last transmission from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 was different from what authorities have been saying since the jetliner disappeared last month with 239 passengers and crew aboard.
http://youtu.be/VVrbym8Cvj0
The last transmission from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 was different from what authorities have been saying since the jetliner disappeared last month with 239 passengers and crew aboard.
But whether the slight difference -- the pilot or copilot says "Good Night, Malaysia 370" on the actual transcript, not "All Right, Good Night" as orginally reported -- is significant is not yet known.
The comments were "exactly what you'd expect" in a cockpit, airline safety expert John Gadzinski told Cable News Network (CNN).
But the discrepancy between what was reported by Malaysian officials and the actual words spoken has added to doubts about the country's ability to handle the crisis and its veracity.
"High criticism is in order at this point," Mary Schiavo, a former inspector general for the US Department of Transportation, told CNN.
The transcript was released by Malaysia's government on Tuesday, after hearing three weeks of criticism about the investigation from air experts and the Chinese government.
Three quarters of the passengers on Flight 370 were from China, and Beijing has been angrily pressing for information about the plane's fate.
The Boeing 777 disappeared March 8, less than an hour after taking off from Kuala Lumpur International Airport on a routine flight to Beijing.
No trace of the plane has been found despite daily searching by an international flotilla of ships and aircraft.
But Malaysia has rejected the criticism and defended its handling of the crisis.
"History will judge us well," acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said recently."
But former US Federal Aviation Administration official Michael Goldfarb told CNN there hadn't been "a straight, clear word that we can have a lot of fidelity in."
"We have the tragedy of the crash, we have the tragedy of an investigation gone awry and then we have questions about where we go from here," Goldfarb said.
The 10 aircraft and nine ships searched a 46,000-square-mile search zone Tuesday, CNN said, prompting Australia to send an air traffic control plane to the area to help prevent midair accidents.
But nothing of significance was located Tuesday, CNN said.
Officials believe the airliner veered sharply off course while in the air between Malaysia and Vietnam, based on data from gound radar because the plane's electronic communication systems were turned off.
But why the plane was turned around and sent over the Indian Ocean, and by whom, are the largest unanswered questions.
An unnamed Malaysian government source told CNN that it considered the turn off-course to have been a "criminal act."
Malaysian investigators also told CNN that they believe the jet was being "flown by someone with good flying knowledge of the aircraft," after it veered off-course.
Malaysia Airlines and the country's Department of Civil Aviation have scheduled a private briefing with Chinese relatives of passengers on Wednesday to explain how authorities determined the flight ended over the Indian Ocean, CNN said.
Technical experts from Malaysia, China and Australia are expected to participate in the briefing, CNN said.
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