Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
    Log in with Twitter

article imageCaleta Tumbes — Hard hit by 2010 tsunami is back from the rubble Special

By Igor I. Solar     Jan 2, 2014 in Travel
Talcahuano - The Tumbes Fishing Cove was devastated by the earthquake and subsequent tsunami that struck central-southern Chile in February 2010. The picturesque place has been completely rebuilt and remains a major attraction in the region.
"Caleta Tumbes" (Spanish for Tumbes Fishing Cove) is located on the peninsula of the same name facing the Bay of Concepción, about 550 kilometers south of Santiago de Chile. Most of the land in the Tumbes Peninsula is owned by the Chilean Navy. However, close to the tip of the peninsula is this quaint coastal village inhabited by about 2,000 residents mostly engaged in artisanal fisheries, seaweed harvesting, and the construction and repair of fishing boats.
Tumbes fishing cove has been rebuilt and local fishermen are back to work.
Tumbes fishing cove has been rebuilt and local fishermen are back to work.
Due to the abundance of marine resources, the Tumbes Peninsula was occupied since time immemorial by Mapuche indigenous tribes. In 1550, Genoese explorer Giovanni Battista Pastene explored the region at the service of the Spanish Crown, took possession of the peninsula and gave the cove the name of "Santa María".
Centuries later in 1816, several Spanish families from Santander, Bilbao and San Sebastian arrived at the place. They were mostly carpenters, shipbuilders and fishermen. The Spanish immigrants worked mainly in the construction of fishing vessels of various sizes, coastal fishing, and offshore whaling.
Historically, the Concepción Region and the Tumbes Peninsula have been affected by several earthquakes. The earthquake and tsunami of February 2010 is the most recent, but the unfortunate fishing village has been hit in the past five centuries by devastating earthquakes and tsunamis in 1570, 1575, 1657, 1751, 1835, and 1960.
Tumbes fishing cove after the earthquake and tsunami of 2010. (Courtesy of Victor Lamas).
Tumbes fishing cove after the earthquake and tsunami of 2010. (Courtesy of Victor Lamas).
VicLamas
File photo: Tumbes fishing cove after the earthquake and tsunami of 2010
File photo: Tumbes fishing cove after the earthquake and tsunami of 2010
VicLamas
Today the fishermen's houses have been rebuilt with concrete structures and raised up design aiming to prevent the impact of future storm surges and tsunamis. The village has spring water, electricity, telephone service, satellite television, a primary school, a medical post, a Catholic Parish, an evangelical church, several modest restaurants, a few small stores, and a symbolic cemetery with a few graves honouring the first immigrant families that inhabited the place.
Tumbes fishing cove has been rebuilt and local fishermen are back to work.
Tumbes fishing cove has been rebuilt and local fishermen are back to work.
Tumbes fishing cove has been rebuilt and local fishermen are back to work.
Tumbes fishing cove has been rebuilt and local fishermen are back to work.
Fishermen work in artisanal capture of fish, shellfish and seaweeds. During a visit in the morning, on a weekday, is not uncommon to meet many divers and fishermen offering for sale a wide variety of fish , mollusks (clams , mussels) and crustaceans, such as giant barnacles and crabs. Crabs are often already cooked and ready to eat, filling the air with fresh seafood aromas that are truly irresistible.
Tumbes fishing cove has been rebuilt and local fishermen are back to work.
Tumbes fishing cove has been rebuilt and local fishermen are back to work.
Caleta Tumbes is a very colorful and beautiful place, but it is mostly a symbol of the work of men and women of the sea, and the resilience and perseverance of its residents who, despite the tragic and frequent earthquakes and tidal waves, have once again rebuilt their village and resumed their lives.
More about Caleta Tumbes, Chile, chile photography
More news from
Latest News
Top News