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article imageU.S. has the highest rates of vaccine suspicion

By Tim Sandle     Jan 27, 2021 in Health
Polls vary slightly but the common trend is that just under half of the U.S. population are unwilling to take a coronavirus vaccine. This is despite the U.S. accounting for one quarter of global cases.
Vaccine conspiracy theorists, peddling falsehoods about vaccine safety and efficacy, have got a lot to answer for in the U.S. context, it seems. A survey finds 47 percent of U.S. citizens are unwilling to take one of the vaccines on offer, and this rate appears to be higher among ethnic minority groups. This is despite the disproportionately high rates in the U.S. and recent declarations from the World Health Organization that the virus will be permanently endemic.
The new survey comes from Invisibly, who surveyed 5,537 members of the U.S. population using an online research tool to understand attitudes toward the coronavirus vaccine. The survey method was to use polling questions in place of adverts on websites. This revealed that the population at large, based on an extrapolation of the data, are divided on their willingness to take the vaccine.
Within the broad headline figure, it was noted that attitudes towards the vaccine are also different among different ethnic groups and ages.
Here, whereas 47 percent indicated they were unwilling to take the vaccine, the figure rose to 50 percent of Latinx people and 53 percent of black people. Whereas with the population identified as white, the figure was down to 38 percent. In terms of age, 33 percent of people over age 55 are unwilling to get the vaccine. This is despite this demographic being at a greater risk of the COVID-19 disease that is caused by the coronavirus.
Concerningly, among those who are willing to have the vaccine, 25 percent indicated they are unlikely to wear a mask after vaccination. This displays a lack of understanding that immunized individuals can still spread the vaccine.
These trends will pose issues for health policy makers to assess and to propose appropriate actions.
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