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health Articles
As research findings go, the question ‘Are Facebook and Twitter to blame for increasing STI rates?’, is certain to spark interest. Data from Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust, suggests a connection.

Wearable electronic aims to help those with depression

A new OLED bracelet has been launched, which aims to help those with depression through light therapy. OLED light sources can emit light at specific wavelengths to help cure depression.

Does alcohol cause PMS?

Researchers reported a link Monday between PMS and drinking alcohol, but could not conclude whether premenstrual suffering causes women to hit the bottle, or the other way round.

World's first penis, scrotum transplant done in US

Doctors at Johns Hopkins University said Monday they have performed the world's first total penis and scrotum transplant on a US military serviceman who was wounded in Afghanistan.

Spotlight on the recent U.S. E.coli outbreak: Interview Special

On Friday, April 13th, the Center for Disease Control confirmed the cause of a multi-state E.coli O157-H7 related to chopped Romaine lettuce. This was the second major incident in the U.S. his year. A leading researcher provides some insights.

Investigation into E. coli outbreak in Alberta, Canada expands

Alberta Health Services (AHS) Environmental Public Health has expanded its investigation into the source of an outbreak of E. coli O157:H7, beyond cases directly linked to an Edmonton restaurant late last month.

CDC warns — Do not eat romaine lettuce as E. coli illness spreads

Consumers, restaurants, and retailers nationwide are being urged by the CDC to throw away any chopped romaine lettuce, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce originating in Yuma, Arizona.

In Romania, distrust of vaccines kills

Measles still claims young lives in Romania, where nearly 40 children have died in an outbreak that many blame on parents being misled by scare stories that vaccinating them is dangerous.

'Life support' for transplant livers better than freezing: study

Keeping transplant livers on "life support" at body temperature preserves them better than the prevailing method of near-freezing, and could reduce the number of donor organs thrown away, a study said Wednesday.

Gates warns new fight needed against resurgent malaria

Bill Gates warned Wednesday that malaria was back on the rise again and would continue to claim more lives worldwide unless governments reinvigorated their push to eradicate the disease.

Interview: How concerned should consumers be about Salmonella? Special

In the U.S., more than 200 million cartons of eggs have been recalled across nine states over concerns of Salmonella, with contaminated produce linked to at least 22 illnesses. How concerned should consumers be? Dr. Joseph Galati provides some answers.

Health officials warn of diphtheria in Venezuela, Haiti

International health authorities are reporting outbreaks of diptheria in Venezuela and Haiti, and that cases of the potentially deadly illness have turned up in Colombia and Brazil as well.

Japan to trial 'world's first urine test' to spot cancer

A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world's first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.

Parental diet before conception affects child's health

A child's health can be compromised not only by a mother who smokes or drinks during pregnancy, but by the obesity and poor diet of both parents well before the act of procreation, researchers said Tuesday.

Spread of flesh-eating ulcer in Australia a 'worsening epidemic'

A severe tissue-destroying ulcer once rare in Australia is rapidly spreading and is now at epidemic proportions in regions of Victoria, prompting infectious diseases experts to call for urgent research into how it is contracted and spread.

Three tax-savings ideas to help seniors

One major expenditure awaiting a large percentage of U.S. citizens near the end of their lives is long-term care. Expenses extend to assisted living facilities or nursing homes. A new guide gives advice.

New e-health solution helps people to live independent lives

It has long been recognized that the longer elderly people can live independently for the better it is for their well-being. Independent living carries risks and to assist with risk avoidance, a new sensor has been developed.

22 illnesses prompt largest recall of shelled eggs since 2010

Rose Acre Farms of Seymour, Indiana late Friday recalled over 200 million eggs because they may be contaminated with Salmonella Braenderup, a bacteria that can cause serious and even fatal illness.

E. coli outbreak across 11 states linked to chopped romaine

Chopped romaine lettuce has been linked to dozens of cases of E. coli in 11 states and anyone who has the leafy green in their refrigerator is told to throw it away immediately, health officials said Friday.

Op-Ed: Curing patients not good for business — Goldman Sachs

The company famous for its social sensitivity has decided that curing sick people simply reduces profits. Goldman Sachs, with a degree of insensitivity or perhaps just more grovelling to the rich, has come up with reasons for people to stay sick.

Data-driven analysis of healthcare cyber risk insurance claims

A new report into data-driven analysis of cyber risk insurance claims in the healthcare sector assesses the types of organizations and institutions that are most vulnerable to attack and which represent the greater insurance risks.

Night owls risk dying younger, should sleep in: study

People who stay up late and have to drag themselves out of bed are likelier to die younger than those who rise and set with the Sun, researchers said Thursday.

Japanese confirmed as world's oldest living man aged 112

Masazo Nonaka from Japan was recognised Tuesday as the world's oldest man at the ripe old age of 112, as his family revealed his secret: sweets and hot baths.

Healthcare needs AI for improved business intelligence

As with other businesses, healthcare has discovered the imperative of linking artificial intelligence capabilities with human activities in order to boost competitiveness.

Digital hub aims to improve youth mental health

Mental health issues remain on of society’s major, and sometimes overlooked, issues, especially among younger people. A U.K. government backed scheme aims to tackle some mental health concerns using digital technology.

Insomnia app promises scientific support

The National Health Service in the U.K. is pioneering a digital approach to combating insomnia. This is via an app called Sleepio. The app has been developed with the help of psychologists to help train a person’s brain into sleeping.

At least 54 children dead in Venezuela measles outbreak: NGO

At least 54 children from an indigenous tribe have died from an outbreak of measles in a remote jungle region of eastern Venezuela, a human rights group said Thursday.

Taxes key in war on 'lifestyle' disease: health experts

Global health leaders declared war on lifestyle diseases Thursday, decrying the impact of tobacco, alcohol and soft drinks on the world's poor, while calling for taxes to curb consumption and finance healthcare.

U.S. health companies launch blockchain pilot

The expansion of blockchain technology has extended to healthcare. Five U.S. based health organizations have launched a pilot scheme, designed to determine if blockchain technology can improve security.

Nick Bolton opens up about digital transformation of fitness Special

Health and fitness expert Nick Bolton chatted with Digital Journal about the digital transformation of fitness, and he opened up about his fitness career.

Mandatory recall issued for kratom due to Salmonella outbreak

The FDA has issued a mandatory recall order for all products containing powdered kratom manufactured by Triangle Pharmanaturals LLC of Las Vegas, Nevada. Some of the products tested positive for Salmonella and are associated with a multistate outbreak.

Interview: Medication non-adherence is a growing problem Special

Medication non-adherence is a growing problem in the U.S. More than half of all hospitalizations are the result of patients failing to take their prescribed medications. A solution comes from Danish startup Klikkit.

Risks of poorly designed electronic health records

There are many advantages with electronic health records, from avoiding lost files to portability. However, if records are not well-designed this can put patients at risk.

Cancer risk from chemicals used to cure processed meats

A new study has added to the body evidence about cancer risks from certain chemicals used in the processed food industry. This time the focus is with chemicals used to cure processed meats.

AI comes to dentistry: The smart toothbrush

FOREO, a Swedish company has debuted the ISSALEXA, an artificially intelligent toothbrush that offers user support by analyzing saliva to detect nerves, anxiousness, stress and other emotional sensitivities.

Technology designed to track what you eat

Scientists have developed tiny tooth-mounted sensors that can track what a person eats. The aim is to use wireless real-time monitoring to increase medical understanding between diet and health.

A.I. assistive and rehab solutions: Interview Special

State-of-the-art technology like artificial intelligence and robotics are changing the way healthcare clinics and professional medical services operate. Bionik CEO Dr. Eric Dusseux provides an overview of recent developments.

Report highlights deepening Venezuela health crisis

Venezuela's opposition-dominated Congress said Monday the country's deepening economic crisis has left hospitals lacking even the most basic medicines and surgical materials.

New drugs make hepatitis C-positive kidneys safe for transplant

Research has shown that an improved new generation of antiviral drugs should help to expand the number of organs available for donation, and reduce the rejection rate by the human body post-surgery.

Study shows geographical trends in drug-related deaths in U.S.

Deaths from drug-use disorders in the U.S. have risen dramatically in the past several decades, hitting West Virginia and Kentucky especially hard, even as mortality rates blamed on other causes, from substance abuse or intentional injury have dropped.

Nano-drops improve shortsightedness

A new type of medicine, described as a ‘nano-drop’, has been designed as a cure for shortsightedness and nearsightedness. This is an alternative to conventional laser correction techniques and to wearing glasses or contact lenses.
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