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article imageBroker takes action against The Wolf of Wall Street

By Tim Sandle     Feb 21, 2014 in Entertainment
Andrew Greene, a former broker, has filed court papers in New York claiming the character Nicky "Rugrat" Koskoff from the movie 'The Wolf of Wall Street' is based on him.
The movie The Wolf of Wall Street has proved to be a big ratings success, as well as a critically acclaimed movie. The film is directed by Martin Scorsese, based on Jordan Belfort's memoir of the same name. The movie stars Leonardo DiCaprio as Belfort, a New York stockbroker who runs a firm that engages in securities fraud and corruption on Wall Street in the 1990s.
The news has now emerged that the producers of Oscar-nominated film Wolf of Wall Street are being sued for $25 million by a former stockbroker who claims he has been depicted as a "depraved" drug-fuelled criminal. According to The Guardian, Greene has said that he worked at Stratton Oakmont, the discredited Long Island brokerage founded by Jordan Belfort, between 1993 and 1996. At the company he was reportedly nicknamed Wigwam, not Rugrat. However, in Belfort's memoir, which formed the basis of Terence Winter's script, Greene is mentioned regularly under his real name. The role is played by actor PJ Byrne in the movie.
The legal papers, printed in The Hollywood Reporter, said: "The motion picture contains various scenes wherein Mr Greene's character is portrayed as a criminal, drug user, degenerate, depraved, and/or devoid of any morality or ethics."
Martin Scorsese discusses the action briefly and the nature of making a controversial movie with The Playlist. The renowned director states:
"In none of those cases was I making a movie just because I wanted to provoke a controversy—I was drawn to make the picture and then prepared myself for a possible controversy because of the subject matter. In this case I was trying to deal as honestly as I could with people in the financial industry. We could have included a scene in which Jordan Belfort suddenly realizes what he’s done and begs for forgiveness, but that would have been false: No one in the industry, from Jordan Belfort to anyone who was involved in the most recent financial meltdown, seems to be terribly sorry about what they did."
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