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Covering speakers

blog:6691:2::0
By Ken Wightman
Posted May 9, 2010 in Arts
This weekend was PodCamp London. The event was held at the University of Western Ontario and was very well attended. I wish David Silverberg had been there. He could do a great report on filing video from a fast unfolding news event using little more than an iPhone and an app from Vericoder Technology called 1st Video.
The all-day event was free and the organizers even supplied lunch. I had a sausage on a bun with a large side order of guilt. I have to give something back, I thought. And so I shot some images to post on the PodCamp Internet site.
When shooting something like PodCamp, try to keep your flash off. It is annoying. If your camera won't take pictures in the light you encounter, you need another camera.
A little motion blur detracts from this shot taken with a Fuji HS10.
A little motion blur detracts from this shot taken with a Fuji HS10.
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Before a talk begins, measure up the space. Decide where to sit to get the best pictures and grab a seat. But, keep a way open so that you can leave your seat, if necessary, to get the best angle. One thing I always do is sit to one side or the other but rarely in front. I don't want to have a mic blocking my view. I choose the side based on the background.
I am finding my Canon S90 an excellent camera that delivers everything that it promised. I'm impressed. I especially love its low light capabilities. The f/2.0 lens teamed with the high ISO speeds is a hard to beat combination.
The Fuji HS10 is another matter. On the plus side it appears to be very well-built. It has survived its first drop without any noticeable damage. It did tumble to a carpeted floor and not concrete but still...
The 24mm lens setting on the Fuji HS10 offers possibilities that even a 28mm lens would miss. My bac...
The 24mm lens setting on the Fuji HS10 offers possibilities that even a 28mm lens would miss. My back is literally up against the wall to get this picture.
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The lens seems very good. It is not on par with a DSLR, but then I didn't think it would be. The picture quality is excellent for the Web.
So, what is not to like. Well, I freely admit that I don't know all about the HS10 but at the moment it is not quite what I expected. I like to use the electronic viewfinder rather than the screen on the back of the camera. Not only does the finder go blank when a picture is taken, it can be sluggish to respond to changes as the lens is zoomed in or out.
Surely this camera cannot be the dog at writing an image file that it presently appears to be. Surely the image does not have to disappear for a moment every time a picture is taken. I'm a patient fellow and I can live with these flaws --- I have to, but I would not have been as quick to buy the HS10 if I had known about these possible flaws.
The Fuji HS10 can be zoomed all the way to 720mm. Wow! And the resulting images are sharp! As can be...
The Fuji HS10 can be zoomed all the way to 720mm. Wow! And the resulting images are sharp! As can be seen from this picture, the sensor has a nice wide latitude when it comes to light.
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