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article imageLinkedIn declining while pulling back services, moderating users

By Michael Krebs     Feb 12, 2014 in Business
After reporting a disappointing outlook in its Q4 2013 earnings call, and while executing a pullback in its services, LinkedIn remains under pressure to prove its platform against notable competitors.
LinkedIn (LNKD) appears to be stumbling against a backdrop of competitors that are fully developing new revenue streams, and the disappointment with LinkedIn's results has become apparent in its stock price — declining more than 20 percent since September.
Social media companies, flush with cash from institutional investors eager for growth, are the natural environment for content marketing programs, and LinkedIn is not an exception. As Adweek reported, LinkedIn's native advertising offerings allows the company to behave in a manner that resembles a publisher.
However, while Twitter (TWTR), Facebook (FB), and Google+ (GOOG) have been making strides with new revenue streams through a wider spectrum of products and platforms, LinkedIn has been demonstrating come confusion across its services — pulling back on products and delivering uncertainty to its user base. The cancellation of its Intro email service occurred only six months after it was introduced, according to The Verge.
Additionally, LinkedIn's enforcement of its Site-Wide Automated Moderating (SWAM) service, intended to silence noisy posters and to eliminate spammers, has caused users to abandon the social platform altogether, as Forbes reported.
The chaotic user experience on LinkedIn is one that is clearly hurting the company, as its 2014 outlook projected a significant decline in user growth.
“I have gotten emails from people who used to be active in Groups who said they went completely moderated… and now they don’t get anything through," LinkedIn expert Jason Alba told Forbes. "I am a group admin and I rarely take time to go through to see the moderated discussions… so I don’t, unless someone emails me and asks to approve their contributions. The seriousness of this is that people will stop using Groups if they can’t get their discussions or comments posted – they deem it a waste of time and move on…”
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