Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.
arts Articles
The road from childhood passion to accomplished writer is often fraught with potholes and learning curves, yet with perseverance and dedication it may just lead to the stars. Or beyond.

Review: E-book explores the Occupation through literary words and worlds Special

The e-book Song of the Caged Bird by Marcello Di Cintio is an exploration of the Palestinian Occupation through the words of literature.

Op-Ed: Surrealist artist favors Day of The Dead over Halloween as sacred Special

While dozens of parties are being planned and the usual traversing of 'trick-or-treaters' are gearing up, there is one group in San Francisco that likes to honor the autumn festivity's original purpose, "a day to honor the dead."

'Lost' Malcolm Lowry novel published

A recently discovered "Lost" novel by British author Malcolm Lowry has been published. The manuscript was written over seventy years ago.

William Morris inspires video game

The work of the Victorian artist William Morris, nowadays more commonly associated with expensive wallpaper, has become the theme of a new computer game in produced association with London's Victoria and Albert Museum.

Inside the production and direction of 'Flak House: The Musical' Special

The lives of World War II continue to inspire books, films, and theatre. “Flak House” is a new musical, now playing in New York, which portrays the live of young men fighting the war against the Nazis in the ‘40s.

Review: New Book about the Crusades & Queen Melisende will amaze & dismay Special

Obscure figures like Hatshepsut come to this reporter's mind when hearing about the forgotten Queen Melisende who ruled over Jerusalem from 1131 to 1153. Little known and often purposely ignored by some of the chroniclers of the time,

Review: 'Concord Floral' an eerie, powerful look at suburban T.O. teens Special

It's hard to write good dialogue and monologue for teen characters. Adult playwrights and screenwriters often suffer from a lack of familiarity with the new lingo, yo, or resort to contrived, artificial “Buffy”-style irony and pop culture.

Op-Ed: Studio 35 where artists of the canvas and of the page converge Special

There's that old saying that a picture is worth a thousand words. Words and images often go together so it is no surprise that Studio 35 would have a poetry reading on Oct. 10 to compliment its art display.

Youthful passion fuels 'Madama Butterfly' Special

Puccini’s “Madama Butterfly” has been accused of racism, misogyny, and gross stereotyping. But at its heart, the opera is really about the passion of youth, and the consequences of choice.

Poet Shane Koyczan releases video 'Shoulders' on treasuring Earth

British Columbian poet Shane Koyczan has released a new poem-video on YouTube, written for The David Suzuki Foundation as part of the environmentalist's Blue Dot Tour, where Koyczan shared the stage with The Barenaked Ladies, Stephen Lewis and more.

Review: Ohio's swamps are setting for new novel by San Francisco writer Special

From the view of today's urban landscape its hard to imagine a swamp land once existed in a place like Ohio. Impressive cities like Columbus, Toledo, Cincinnati say little about a rural past.

Review: The Five & the Prophecy of Prana Special

Set in modern Tokyo, "The Five and the Prophecy of Prana" is an extraordinary festival of dance, drama, manga art and cutting hip-hop. The show has been playing at The Barbican in London.

Sex, drink, food, and trouble: Verdi's Falstaff lives large Special

Canadian opera singer Gerald Finley says the timing’s right to make his debut as one of opera’s biggest and most beloved party boys.

Video: Marvellous arrangements of single-cell aquatic organisms

Diatom specialist Klaus Kemp arranges unicellular algae into complex patterns only visible under magnification.The technique dating from the Victorian era mixes science and art to reveal the astounding beauty of some of the smallest organisms on Earth.

Ancient textile art pieces returned to Peru from Sweden

Peru's National Museum of Archaeology, Anthropology and History will display until October 12 a priceless mantle recovered from Gothenburg, Sweden. This textile piece ascribed to the Paracas culture is almost 2,000 years old and is in perfect condition.

Missing Mozart sonata discovered by accident

A Hungarian scholar has accidentally come across an original score by Mozart which had been thought lost since the maestro wrote it in the 18th Century.

Op-Ed: Not the voice of my generation: Lena Dunham's shameful faux pas

Lena Dunham, the self proclaimed "voice of her generation," is on a roll with her new book, "Not That Kind of Girl," which is going on tour with various opening acts...and people quickly grew upset when it turned out the artists were not being paid.

Job Carr Cabin's Pioneer Days preserves history and educates kids Special

Pioneer Days at the Job Carr Cabin Museum at Old Town Park in Tacoma celebrates the birth of a city while providing entertainment and education to families.

Op-Ed: Audio Describer donates her voice to help those with disabilities Special

With so much these days about access and having a voice to be heard, voice-over artist Michele Spitz is very outspoken when it has to do with access to the arts.

Review: Breaking molds of conventional musicians — Karen Stever inspires Special

Take a moment to step into the enchanting world of Stever, an independent musician who walks to her own beat while inspiring her growing fan base. Her groundbreaking style is unconventional and unique in her own right.

Op-Ed: LINE Webtoon, a Web comic service, makes U.S. and global debut

LINE Webtoon recently made its global debut, as well as in the United States. The Internet comic series has been a viral sensation in Korea since NAVER launched the service in 2004.

Artist claims Walmart is selling her painting without permission

In a bizarre intersection of the fine arts and big business, an artist is claiming that Walmart is selling her painting without her permission.

The Sidewalk Crusaders jazz up Toronto Special

On Saturday afternoon the corner of Yonge and Dundas was getting a burst of jazz from a creative group of young men knew as The Sidewalk Crusaders. These music students have taken to the streets since 2012 when Peter Cavanagh had an idea.

Launching a new classical season with flash and fury Special

Who says classical music isn't exciting? The Toronto Symphony Orchestra launched its latest season in fine style this week, with superstar violinist Joshua Bell providing characteristic fire and drama.

Comics, Narrative, and the Unstable Other in Who’s Hump? Special

On September 24th Chicago’s LATITUDE gallery space will host a Winkelman-Milling Projects show called Who’s HUMP?, the latest in a series of WMP shows that spotlight art and artists exploring boundaries in the windy city and beyond.

Dancing in silence: Deaf flamenco dancer forms dance company

Deaf since the age of six, 38-year-old María de los Ángeles Narváez Anguita has not let that hold her back. Both a dancer and also an entrepreneur, she has formed her own flamenco company and is starring in a documentary film.

Op-Ed: Aga Khan Museum opens in Toronto Special

After 18 years, the dream of an Islamic centre for art and community has become a reality — not, as originally intended, in London, England, but in Toronto.

Review: Poet Shane Koyczan debuts new video-poem 'Troll' on cyberbullying Special

Canadian poet Shane Koyczan, best known recently for his To This Day anti-bullying video-poetry, released another poetic critique of cyber-bullying appropriately titled Troll. It's one of the most poignant looks at the pain caused by online bullies.

Review: Joy Robinson — Bauhaus and beyond

Australian artist Joy Robinson is on a quest for original concepts inspired by modernism. Her exhibition, 'Bauhaus and Beyond' explores the autonomy of geometric abstraction as an aesthetic phenomenon in its own right.

Review: New frontier in graphic art — Hidden mystery of a water drop Special

If you’ve been noticing that visual art has simply blown away its own boundaries in recent years, a lot more is happening. Experimental visual art, notably “unique” imaging, is becoming the new frontier.

Exhibit: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe Special

Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe, I attended this exhibition that was held at the Brooklyn museum. Although, I openly admit that I have more of a hand-bag fetishist fascination this exhibition was intriguing.

Op-Ed: How to be a full-time poet

After 21 years, I still find it entertaining, watching the looks on people’s faces, when they hear that poetry has sustained me for two decades. I have sat on panels, and had countless discussions with poets who’ve wanted my secret, so here it is!!

Toronto-based artist uses everyday objects in her drawings Special

Hyemi Jeong is a 21-year old engineering student based out of Toronto. Inspired by illustrations by Javier Perez while in high school in South Korea, she began creating her own work incorporating everyday objects in drawings after moving to Canada.

Review: Barbara Kruger, an exhibition to question your mind

Between June and August, American conceptual artist Barbara Kruger was the very special guest of Modern Art Oxford, one of the UK’s leading venues for modern and contemporary visual art based in Oxford, England, with a major exhibition of her works.

75-year-old retiree sculpts 150-ft 'There Be Dragons' from hedge

Retiree 75-year-old gardener John Brooker has undertaken a work of love...spending two to three days a week for two to three weeks out of the month trimming his hedge. Not any old green hedge, but an outstanding 150-ft green dragon hedge.

Review: Short story collection an exercise in tight prose

The new collection of short stories by Canadian author Sean Johnston is flash fiction at its best: reflective, innovative, and daring in its subject matter.

Artist uses electronic waste to create art

In a unique exhibition in the city of Bangalore in India, Swiss artist Raphael Perret has created art out of electronic waste, to spread awareness about the many dangers of this kind of refuse.

Review: Soulpepper's 'Crucible' remount in Toronto still full of power Special

“Death of a Salesman” may be Arthur Miller’s most revered play, but “The Crucible”, his 1953 drama about the seventeenth-century witch trials in Salem, Massachusetts, holds up as his most stinging study of evil and hypocrisy in human nature.

Review: Misdiagnosed — A new book about misdiagnosis and health Special

Imagine being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis…and then finding out it was nothing more than gluten sensitivity. This is, incredibly, what happened to one woman and she has used this experience to write a memoir.

Review: 'Glenn' a complex, abstract tribute to iconic Toronto pianist Special

From the peak of his career to his death in 1982, Glenn Gould was a baffling enigma as much as he was a classical-music superstar. As many artistic geniuses were, from Picasso to Salinger, the Toronto pianist could be eccentric and difficult.

Corporate

Help & Support

News Links

copyright © 2014 digitaljournal.com   |   powered by dell servers