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article imageDiocletian's Roman Amphitheatre discovered in Split, Croatia

By Paul Bradbury     Nov 17, 2013 in Travel
Split - With Split continuing to enjoy its record-breaking season, a reminder of the treasures of the city's heritage with a major Roman discovery.
A fourth-century Roman amphiteatre has been discovered under one of Split's busiest streets in Croatia, according to a report in Croatia Week on November 14, 2013.
The discovery is part of the complex built by Emperor Diocletian, who retired to Split, and whose waterfront palace is the city's most important tourist attraction. The amphitheatre was discovered under one of Split's most important traffic arteries, Domovinskog Rata.
“According to the latest research findings, which are still in progress, it was discovered that this is not a theater but an amphitheater with an arena in the range of 50 meters. Because of this discovery, we will not stop life in the city, but we will preserve the site and fill it in temporarily until we prepare its presentation. It’s not simple. It is very complex, but also possible, but for that we will need additional funds. In speaking with city officials it has been agreed to access EU funds. We will create a valuable project that will at the very heart of Split and show the monument in all of its exceptional quality, ” said Conservation department head Radoslav Bužančić at a press conference held to announce the discovery.
Diocletian s Palace as it looks today  Split s most popular tourist attraction.
Diocletian's Palace as it looks today, Split's most popular tourist attraction.
Split Tourist Board
"This discovery shows that Diocletian's palace had all the attributes of an imperial palace, even though Diocletian was retired. Maybe somewhere there could be even a hypodrome, because all imperial palaces had such venues," Bužančić told Dalmacija News.
The Roman roads of Dalmatia offer another angle in the region s rich tourism offer.
The Roman roads of Dalmatia offer another angle in the region's rich tourism offer.
The discovery is the latest finding in what is clearly a rich source of unexplored heritage — the Roman ruins and roads of Dalmatia. Digital Journal recently travelled to the town of Trilj to visit the superbly preserved miliary camp at Gardun, whose partial excavation has been hampered by limited funding opportunities. It is an area of tourism the Central Dalamtia Tourist Board is looking to expand, as interest in the treasures of inland Dalmatia away from the beach become more widely known.
The Roman military complex near Trilj is but one of many unexplored Roman treasures in Dalmatia.
The Roman military complex near Trilj is but one of many unexplored Roman treasures in Dalmatia.
More about split croatia, Croatia, diocletian, Amphitheatre
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