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article imageDemocrat Cory Booker wins special New Jersey Senate seat race

By Andrew Ellis     Oct 17, 2013 in Politics
Newark - It looks as though Democratic mayor of Newark Cory Booker is going to be bringing his undeniable charisma to the District of Columbia.
According to Reuters, Booker "unofficially" won the special election Wednesday night to fill the U.S. Senate seat of the late Democrat Frank Lautenberg who died in June at the age of 89.
With 95 percent of the precincts reporting, His 56 percent of the vote beat out the Republican nominee Steve Loneghan 44 percent Wednesday night, according to The Los Angeles Times.
The Guardian said that the result is partly "a reflection" of how Booker has used his very likable personality and his ability to utilize different kinds of media to make himself well-known, not just in New Jersey, but across the rest of the country as well.
He gave a victory speech at Newark's Prudential Center and thanking everyone who went out in supported him by casting their votes at a time when politics aren't exactly on people's list of favorites, according to The Los Angeles Times.
"Despite the cynicism and the negativity we often see on TV, despite a special election, New Jerseyans, hundreds of thousands, rejected all that and came out and voted," he told the crowd. "But more than that, you didn't just vote, but you believed that your voice and your vote mattered."
According to Reuters, Booker will join Republican Tim Scott from South Carolina as the country's only two black senators.
During his short campaign, he raised $11 million and outspent his opponent with a "ratio of eight to one," according to The Guardian. More than half that money came from out-of-state donors. He also recruited his celebrity friends ranging from Oprah to Facebook's own Mark Zuckerberg to help campaign for him.
Despite his popularity, according to The Los Angeles Times, his "margin of victory" was actually closer than polls had predicted. Some say that this may be because he spent so much time campaigning out of state that residents of New Jersey may have wondered whether he was really in it to serve the people or just so he could help his national reputation.
His opponent used this, according to The Guardian, and said Booker was a "show pony" and that "We need a leader, not a tweeter."
Booker will now have a year before he has to campaign again to keep his seat as a senator, according to The Los Angeles Times.
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