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In the Media

article imageOp-Ed: The changing face of the Google homepage

article:359580:14::0
By Alexander Baron
Oct 5, 2013 in Internet
1 more article on this subject:
Sep 28, 2013 - Google to upgrade its search engine - 2 comments
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In case you hadn't noticed, your Google interface has changed recently. Some might say it has a less than intuitive feel, but give it time.
What did the Google homepage look like when the search engine/website was launched fifteen years ago? The first screengrab below, from the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine, is dated November 11, 1998. Yes, it did list 25 million pages, with the promise "soon to be much bigger." That was arguably the understatement of the last century, and in the decade and a third of this one, the company labelled evil by one of our unthinking politicians has excelled itself and then some.
As you can see, the homepage has not changed much over time, but this sameness is deceptive. The latest version can be seen in the penultimate screengrab below. Press the new app button — the nine small squares next to SIGN IN — and no fewer than nine features are revealed — see bottom screengrab. Press the More link, and six more turn up including Google Blogger and Google Translate. Press Even more from Google, and it explodes.
Google have also recently changed their logo, but not so anyone would notice.
The one criticism that might be made of the new layout is that it displays too few features, but if you are using Google Chrome you can simply select whatever it is you want — say Google News — and add it to your bookmarks at the top of the screen, see for example the image dated April 30, 2007, below.
The list of features for this totally free service is truly amazing. Margaret Hodge should thank her lucky stars that such EVIL people as Sergey Brin are exploiting us in this fashion. After all, wouldn't you rather pay 60p for a first class stamp to send a letter that might arrive the next day when courtesy of Google you can email your correspondent instantaneously for free?
The Google homepage of November 11  1998 from the Wayback Machine; 25 million pages. Zounds!
The Google homepage of November 11, 1998 from the Wayback Machine; 25 million pages. Zounds!
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How the Google homepage looked on April 8  2000  from the Wayback Machine.
How the Google homepage looked on April 8, 2000, from the Wayback Machine.
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The Google homepage of April 21  2003  from the Wayback Machine.
The Google homepage of April 21, 2003, from the Wayback Machine.
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The Google homepage of April 30  2007  from the Wayback Machine. Note the sign in link in the top ri...
The Google homepage of April 30, 2007, from the Wayback Machine. Note the sign in link in the top right hand corner. The icons for Apps, ITV, Google News and YouTube are from my homepage, October 3, 2013.
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The Google homepage of December 18  2010  from the Wayback Machine.
The Google homepage of December 18, 2010, from the Wayback Machine.
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The Google homepage of September 15  2013  from the Wayback Machine.
The Google homepage of September 15, 2013, from the Wayback Machine.
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The Google homepage of October 3  2013.
The Google homepage of October 3, 2013.
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The Google homepage of October 3  2013 after pressing the apps grid next to the sign in button.
The Google homepage of October 3, 2013 after pressing the apps grid next to the sign in button.
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This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
article:359580:14::0
More about Wayback machine, Google logo, Google Translate
 
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