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article imagePossible meteorite lights up the sky in the Canary Islands, Spain

By Anne Sewell     Aug 26, 2013 in Science
Twitter went a little wild at 10:35pm local time on Sunday in the north of the Canary Islands, as witnesses reported a light streaking across the sky, "as bright as if it was daytime."
The first tweet emanated from Spain's Air Traffic Control (@controladores) Twitter feed, reporting that a green light "brighter than the day" flashed across the sky, lasting three seconds. This was reported by both pilots and also witnesses on the ground.
The @controladores tweet read, "Various aircraft over the north of the Canary Islands just reported a bright light, lasting 3 seconds, as if it was daytime."
Adding: "From the descriptions given by pilots it was probably a meteorite. Even so, protocols oblige that the military be informed."
Spain s Air Traffic Control sent tweets after a meteor was seen streaking across the sky in the nort...
Spain's Air Traffic Control sent tweets after a meteor was seen streaking across the sky in the north of the Canary Islands.
Twitter screen
Spain s Air Traffic Control sent tweets after a meteor was seen streaking across the sky in the nort...
Spain's Air Traffic Control sent tweets after a meteor was seen streaking across the sky in the north of the Canary Islands.
Twitter screen
According to witnesses, the phenomenon looked like "a white light coming down, with a long tail, falling."
According to Javier Licandro of the Canaries Institute of Astrophysics (IAC) based in Tenerife, it was most likely a meteoroid of the kind that broke up in the atmosphere, rather than a meteorite which survives contact with the ground.
He tweeted: "It would be a fireball or super fireball (depending on brightness). Meteor would be the piece that had reached the ground."
Followed by: "It probably would have been destroyed in the atmosphere."
However, he did not deny the possibility that this could be the remains of an old satellite.
Licandro told the media that he would check data recorded by the observatories on Tenerife and La Palma to see if they had registered the phenomenon.
While there has been no official explanation as yet, Twitter still continues to thrive with comments from witnesses.
One witness, @German_Herrera1 wrote: "I also saw from Guia de Isora! It was a brief moment and then disappeared."
Another, @Gabriel_Vazque, concurred with him, saying: "I also saw it from my home in La Laguna, a light green, for 3 seconds, stunning!"
More about Canary islands, Meteor, Spain, Tenerife, la palma
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