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In the Media

article imageGoogle has removed 100 million piracy links during 2013

article:355473:11::0
By Tim Sandle
Jul 29, 2013 in Technology
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Over 100 million requests have been made to Google to remove more than 100 million links since January 2013. The requests relate to web pages considered to be in breach of copyright laws.
So far this year double the number of requests, compared with 2012, have been received by Google from copyright holders, according to IT Pro. The requests are to remove alleged 'illegal' content. Google publishes all requests in its Transparency Report.
Many of the takedown requests made under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) and other national copyright laws. DMCA is a U.S. copyright law that implements two 1996 treaties of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). It criminalizes production and dissemination of technology, devices, or services intended to circumvent measures (commonly known as digital rights management or DRM) that control access to copyrighted works.
The website domains concerned are almost entirely person-to-person file-sharing services, such as Fenopy.eu, extratorrent.com, torrenthound.com, filestube.com and bittorrent.com. These technologies are perfectly legal; however some of the content shared on them is not.
For example, BitTorrent is a protocol supporting the practice of peer-to-peer file sharing that is used to distribute large amounts of data over the Internet. BitTorrent is one of the most common protocols for transferring large files and peer-to-peer networks.
Examples of activities that fall under the 'illegal' grouping are:
Downloading or sharing a copyrighted movie.
Sharing copyrighted songs (music) to other people who have not purchased those songs or downloading songs from other people when you've not purchased that song.
Sharing or downloading computer software (programs, games, etc.).
Downloading or sharing a copyrighted TV show or program.
With file sharing continuing to be on the rise, it is likely that the number of requests Google will receive is likely to rise.
article:355473:11::0
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