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article imageReview: Historic buildings and rural customs at the Norwegian Folk Museum Special

By Igor I. Solar     Jul 22, 2013 in Travel
Oslo - The Norwegian Museum of Cultural History, also known as the Norwegian Folk Museum, located in Oslo’s Bygdøy Peninsula, is a magnificent display of historic buildings and traditions of urban and rural life stretching from the Middle Ages to the present.
The Norwegian Folk Museum (Norsk Folkemuseum) is located in the borough of Bygdøy in Oslo and contains a wide range of rural log cabins, farmhouses, and small village dwellings which have been relocated from different regions of Norway. The museum was founded in 1894, acquired the land currently occupied in the late 19th century, and opened to the public in 1901. In 1907, the museum was expanded to include collections at a nearby site belonging to King Oscar II, who was the King of Norway until 1905.
The large open-air museum, with an area of 14 hectares, resembles a park with old farmhouses belonging to different social classes and a replica of an ancient Norwegian town with a cobblestone road and colorful wooden houses. The buildings, originally located in different districts of the country were disassembled and reconstructed following the previous model and the initial setting.
The large open-air museum  with an area of 14 hectares  resembles a park. The buildings  originally ...
The large open-air museum, with an area of 14 hectares, resembles a park. The buildings, originally located in different districts of the country were disassembled and reconstructed following the previous model and the initial setting.
A street in the  Old Town  section of the Norwegian Museum of Cultural History in the Bygdøy Penins...
A street in the "Old Town" section of the Norwegian Museum of Cultural History in the Bygdøy Peninsula, Oslo, Norway.
James Cridland
At present, there are about 150 buildings including medieval houses and barns, and more recent buildings which contain furniture and artifacts commonly used in rural environments in 19th and 20th centuries’ Norway. Among the oldest and most important pieces, there are five medieval buildings among which the most outstanding is Stavkirke, the medieval wooden Christian church, originally from Gol, Hallingdal, Norway, built in 1216.
Stavkirke  the medieval wooden Christian church  originally from Gol  Hallingdal  Norway. The church...
Stavkirke, the medieval wooden Christian church, originally from Gol, Hallingdal, Norway. The church was built in 1216.
There are about 150 historic buildings at the Norwegian Folk Museum. Among the oldest and most impor...
There are about 150 historic buildings at the Norwegian Folk Museum. Among the oldest and most important pieces, are 5 medieval log houses from various regions of Norway.
This old farmhouse was built in the 1300s  and lifted onto posts in the 1700s. Originally from Hovin...
This old farmhouse was built in the 1300s, and lifted onto posts in the 1700s. Originally from Hovin, the building was disassembled and relocated to the Norwegian Folk Museum in Oslo.
There are about 150 historic buildings at the Norwegian Folk Museum. Among the oldest and most impor...
There are about 150 historic buildings at the Norwegian Folk Museum. Among the oldest and most important pieces, are 5 medieval log houses from various regions of Norway.
Several of the old buildings are accessible to the public. Visitors can see museum staff wearing period costumes while performing domestic chores in the manner of the ancient inhabitants of the rural areas of the country.
The Museum also has furniture, clothing, textiles, toys, tools and farming utensils. Additionally, the museum carries out historical research supported by an extensive collection of documents and a large photo archive. Among the main focuses of research are the history and culture of the Sami, the indigenous people of Scandinavia.
Visitors can see museum staff wearing period costumes while performing domestic chores in the manner...
Visitors can see museum staff wearing period costumes while performing domestic chores in the manner of the ancient inhabitants of the rural areas of the country.
The Norwegian Folk Museum keeps alive Norway’s history and traditions and contributes to the understanding of the daily life and living conditions in Norway since the Middle Ages to present time. The Museum operates 360 days a year. In summer it is open from 10:00 to 18:00 hrs. Entrance fee is NOK 110 (approximately US $ 18). The Bygdøy Peninsula is easily accessible from the center of Oslo by bus line No. 30.
Related articles on cultural sights in Frogner, Oslo:
History and maritime exploration at the Bygdøy Peninsula museums
Gustav Vigeland’s Sculpture Park and Gardens at Frogner, Oslo
More about Bigdoy Peninsula, Norwegian Folk Museum, oslo norway, History, Rural life
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