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article imageEurovision 2014: EBU announce provisional dates

By Mathew Wace Peck     May 21, 2013 in Entertainment
The 2013 musical extravaganza may only just have taken place but the Eurovision Song Contest bandwagon continues to roll, with the news that provisional dates for 2014 have already been set.
The 2013 musical extravaganza may only just have taken place but the Eurovision Song Contest bandwagon continues to roll, with the news that provisional dates for 2014 have already been set.
Having first been staged in 1956, the Eurovision Song Contest is the biggest music competition in the world.
At the weekend, 26 countries competed in the 2013 Eurovision Final, in Malmö, Sweden, where Denmark came out on top with its entry, Emmelie de Forest singing “Only Teardrops”.
Consequently, Eurovision 2014 – the 59th Eurovision Song Contest – will be hosted by the winners: Denmark. Shortly, Denmark will decide in which of its cities next year’s event will take place.
According to ESC Today, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) – the organisation responsible for the contest – has already announced the three provisional dates – 13, 15 and 17 May – for Eurovision 2014 will be held. The final choice, however, will be decided on by Denmark’s national television broadcaster, in consultation with the EBU.
As to the 2014 venue, hopes are riding high that Copengahen will be chosen. Not least because Copenhagen – Denmark’s capital city – is linked to the 2013 host city, Malmö, by the Øresundsbron Bridge, the famous Sweden–Denmark bridge-tunnel: the Öresund (Swedish) / Øresund (Danish), which connects Scandinavia's road and rail networks with those of Central and Western Europe.
Eurovision Song Contest 2014
Over the coming months, EBU member countries will, first, decide whether to compete in Eurovision 2014, second, set about choosing who they will send and, third, what their artists will sing.
These decision processes vary from country to country. In the UK, the BBC appears to take the “We know best” approach by appointing the British entry itself – often with disastrous results! Other countries use a more democratic selection process: In some, winners from TV talent shows such as The X Factor or The Voice go on to represent their country. In others, the national broadcaster holds a Eurovision Song Contest-specific talent contest in order for the public to choose – the best example being Sweden, where every year bar its first appearance in the contest in 1958, the popular Melodifestivalen has been held.
Meanwhile, Emmelie de Forest, 20, is riding high after her triumphant win. “It’s amazing for me to win in Sweden, I am half Swedish, my father was Swedish, so he would be so proud. I mean it’s like my second home country so to win here is amazing,” she said after her win on Saturday.
The Eurovision Song Contest is organised annually by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). To qualify, countries do not have to be part of Europe. Despite the “Euro” in “Eurovision”, eligibility is not determined by geographic inclusion within the European continent and bears no relation to the the membership or otherwise of the European Union (EU). Rather, any country that is an Active Member (as opposed to an Associate Member) – of the EBU can take part.
More about Eurovision song contest, Eurovision 2014, EBU, Denmark, Emmelie de Forest
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