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article imageOp-Ed: What is Missing White Woman Syndrome?

By Alexander Baron     May 9, 2013 in Politics
Cleveland - White victims get more media coverage than black ones. Who says so? The obviously overpaid black academic Charlton McIlwain.
Guess what, the all-pervasive international racist conspiracy just got even bigger. The realisation that Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight were alive long after all but the most optimistic had given them up for dead was amazing news. Their rescue was one of those profoundly moving moments, in spite of the horror of their former situation and the horrific relevations we know are still to come. Yet somehow this is a race issue, for one man and one woman at least. The man is Charlton McIlwain, one of those sadly far too common black academics who fail to see the irony of people like him being paid excessive salaries and having their books subsidised by the Great White Bigot while they harp on about how deprived and mistreated are all blacks.
Mr - nay - Professor, McIlwain appears to have discovered yet another form of racism: Missing White Woman Syndrome.This mythical mental illness is explained and rationalised in some detail by the BBC, and of course most of this is flim flam. Take this claim by Natalie Wilson of the Black And Missing Foundation:
24-year-old black woman Tamika Huston went missing in Spartanburg, South Carolina, in 2004. Journalists seemed indifferent. "The family really struggled to get any coverage whatsoever," says Wilson. More than a year after Huston's disappearance, a former boyfriend pleaded guilty to her murder.
All the above may be true, but Miss Huston was not reported missing for nearly three weeks, which may just indicate that her family were not concerned for her safety, so if they were "indifferent", why should journalists have been otherwise?
The simple truth is that people go "missing" all over the world every day. Most of them turn up a short while later, but some don't. In the UK there is now a dedicated official missing persons website.Take a gander at some of the names listed there, and see how many you recognise.
When Amanda Berry disappeared in 2003, she was 16 years old. Can neither Miss Wilson nor Professor McIlwain see any difference between the disappearance of a 24 year old woman and a 16 year old girl? And not all white girls who disappear off the face of the Earth are well publicised. Ever heard of Lucy Partington? She disappeared in 1973, but the wide world never heard of her until she was named as a victim of serial killers Fred and Rose West. How many of the white male victims of serial killers John Gacy or Denis Nilsen can you name? Maybe Rob Piest, the last of Gacy's victims.
The simple fact is that some murders receive enormous publicity, others relatively little. The assassination of the black Martin Luther King Junior did; that of the white Olof Palme received relatively little after the initial media outburst, certainly for so senior a politician. Generally, the murders of women receive more publicity than that of men, and the murders of the elderly and the young even more, especially the latter. Missing women so so, missing men are two a penny.
One other thing about the disappearance of Tamika Huston, her killer was black. Maybe the white liberals in the mass media were afraid of giving disproportionate publicity to black killers? Either way, Charlton McIlwain, Natalie Wilson and all the other agitators who can find racism in an egg cup should get a life. Unlike most of America's blue collar workers - white, black and other - this tenured professor and not-for-profit tax-deductible Miss Wilson don't have to worry about their companies filing for bankruptcy or their jobs being outsourced to India.
This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
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