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article imageLack of funds delaying brain disease research

By Tim Sandle     Feb 8, 2013 in Science
Scientists have claimed that a lack of federal funds is delaying research into brain diseases and eye disorders, according to an American study.
The views of the scientists comes from a survey which questioned more than 170 leading biomedical scientists working on brain and eye diseases. From the survey, 91% agreed that a lack of funding was slowing down research and even forcing some scientists to quit the field.
The main findings were:
91 percent agreed that a lack of funding for brain and eye disease research is driving scientists from the field.
96 percent identified limited funding as a top barrier to entry for new scientists in the fields of brain and eye disease research.
94 percent agreed that a lack of funding is preventing important advances in brain and eye disease research.
The research related to such areas as Alzheimer's disease, macular degeneration and glaucoma. The study argues that the expenditure for research will help off-set the growing healthcare bill for people suffering from brain diseases. By 2050 the U.S. expenditure on helping people with Alzheimer's is estimated to reach $1.1 trillion, according to the Globe and Mail.
The study was commissioned by the BrightFocus Foundation. BrightFocus Foundation is the new name for the non-profit American Health. Assistance campaign organization. In a statement, Stacy Haller, president and chief executive officer of the Foundation said in a news release:
"Cures for these brain and eye diseases can be found if we give researchers the resources and tools they require. Nearly 20 million people in the US are affected by Alzheimer's disease, macular degeneration or glaucoma. That number is climbing with an aging population, threatening our families, our healthcare and our economy. Eradicating these diseases should be a much higher national priority.”
The reason for the study’s focus on brain and eye diseases is due to a growing scientific view that there is a connection between diseases of mind and sight.
More about brain disease, eye disorder, Eye disease, Brain disorder, Alzheimers
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