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article imageOp-Ed: Funny or cruel, this doomsday viral video may be the best of 2012

By Greta McClain     Dec 29, 2012 in Internet
One of the biggest stories of 2012 was that people across the world were convinced that the end of the Mayan calender meant the end of the world.
An entire commercial industry developed, aimed at helping people prepare for the "Apocalypse". Doomsday videos and "I survived 2012 Doomsday" shirts and hats began appearing across the internet, along with books on how to prepare and survive the apocalypse. Survivalist supply stores received a substantial economic boost from those convinced the Mayan calendar predicted catastrophe and chaos.
Digital Journal reported that one Chinese man decided the best way to prepare was to build tsunami-proof survival pods. Built by Liu Quiyan and dubbed "Noah's Ark", the pods come equipped with seat-belts and oxygen tanks, as well as having the ability to float on water. Besides trying to survive the "end of the world", Qiyuan's hope was that if he and the doomsday theorist were wrong, the Chinese government would purchase his pods to use them in case of earthquakes or tsunamis.
The phenomenon even had governments trying to reassure citizens. According to a Digital Journal report, the U.S. government's official web portal tried to calm people's fear, telling citizens:
"Many of the rumors involve the Mayan calendar ending in 2012 (it won't), a comet causing catastrophic effects (definitely not), a hidden planet sneaking up and colliding with us (no and no), and many others."
Officials in Russia urged citizens to call the emergency situations ministry if they had fears or questions, while also telling them:
"We don't believe in the 'end of the world' fable. But we're ready to help people with any emergency situation."
According to Digital Journal, even archaeologists and other scientists joined in the fray, holding a meeting in Mexico City in October to discuss the Mayan calendar's end
While some in the world were panicking and preparing, most did not buy into the doomsday theories, going about their normal life and treating December 21, 2012 as any other day. That does not mean the doomsday seed had not been planted however, providing an opportunity for someone to play the "ultimate" prank.
Vitaly Zdorovetskiy, a Russian born man who moved to the United States with his grandmother, decided to turn his love of acting, and for comedy, into an "End of the World" prank that has gone viral. Zdorovetskiy, who goes by the name VitalyzdTv on Youtube, executed what some are calling be the best doomsday prank to date.
In the video, based in an east coast city in Florida, he talks on his cellular phone in front of everyday citizens going about their day. Announcing that a huge tsunami has hit and devastated New York, he begins to cry. Those around him begin to take notice, and he tells them the tsunami is heading towards Florida. He then tells them that everyone must head west to avoid the devastation, offering to allow them to escape with him and his mother. Some call the prank cruel, while others believe it to be hysterical. The popularity of the video is not in doubt however, receiving 6,223,117 views in just 9 days time, as well as having more than 48,000 likes.
Take a look and give your thoughts.
This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
More about 2012 doomsday, Doomsday, Apocalypse, mayan apocalypse, Video
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