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article imagePhoto Essay: Close-ups of garden and wild flowers Special

By Igor I. Solar     Dec 26, 2012 in Environment
Every nature lover or gardening enthusiast enjoys the diversity of plants and the forms, features and colors of flowers, which are often regrettably ephemeral. Thus, capturing their beauty in photographs is desirable, but requires practice and patience.
Shooting colorful objects up close is always attractive and interesting. Unfortunately, it is not always easy to achieve absolutely clear close-up images. It requires a camera with a good macro lens and the use of a tripod. Depending on the position of the subject, using a tripod is not always possible, and windless weather conditions, a lot of patience and a steady hand are essential to achieve well-focused pictures.
Clematis
Clematis
White rose
White rose
Zantedeschia
Zantedeschia
Thunbergia alata (Black-eyed Susan)
Thunbergia alata (Black-eyed Susan)
Cactus flower
Cactus flower
The images obtained with a macro lens can highlight particular aspects of flowers, focusing on details of the anatomy such as the arrangement of petals, the shape and distribution of the pistil and stamens, and the look and color of each structure at the time the flower is at its optimum appearance.
Viburnum
Viburnum
Weigela florida
Weigela florida
Red rose
Red rose
Crane Flower or Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia reginae)
Crane Flower or Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia reginae)
This photo-essay includes mainly images of flowers obtained in my garden in the current spring-summer season (Southern Hemisphere), a few pictures of wild plants’ blooms captured in a park near my home, and some frequent visitors to my backyard.
Pelargonium
Pelargonium
Peace lily (Spathiphyllum cochlearispathum)
Peace lily (Spathiphyllum cochlearispathum)
Lilium
Lilium
Alstroemeria
Alstroemeria
Alstroemeria
Alstroemeria
In order to communicate more than just colorful images, I have included in most of the pictures at least the common name, and in many cases the scientific name of the plants. In some instances, I do not know the name of the plant, but the images seemed attractive enough to include them in the collection. Readers of Digital Journal who are gardening fans or skilled botanists, and can recognize plants whose name are missing, please indicate the identity of the plant (common or scientific name) in the comments section below.
Paquerette - Chrysantemum
Paquerette - Chrysantemum
Bigleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla)
Bigleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla)
White lilac
White lilac
Leptospermum
Leptospermum
Fuchsia
Fuchsia
Clover
Clover
Clematis montana
Clematis montana
California lilac (Ceanothus)
California lilac (Ceanothus)
Bottlebrush (Callistemon lanceolatus)
Bottlebrush (Callistemon lanceolatus)
Cactus flower
Cactus flower
Aquilegia (Aquilegia vulgaris)
Aquilegia (Aquilegia vulgaris)
Garden Geranium  malva (Pelargonium hortorum)
Garden Geranium, malva (Pelargonium hortorum)
 No name
"No name"
 No name
"No name"
 No name
"No name"
 No name
"No name"
 No name
"No name"
Butterflies move too quickly for photography  but a caterpillar is always a good subject for a close...
Butterflies move too quickly for photography, but a caterpillar is always a good subject for a close-up.
This bird species  known as  chincol  (Zonotrichia capensis)  is a regular visitor in my garden.
This bird species, known as "chincol" (Zonotrichia capensis), is a regular visitor in my garden.
More about closeup, Flowering plants, Environment, Gardening, Garden flowers
 
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