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article imagePhoto Essay: Scenes of protest in Málaga and Fuengirola, Spain Special

By Anne Sewell     Dec 26, 2012 in World
We look back on past protests in both Málaga city and Fuengirola, Spain, and wonder what lies ahead for Spain and the rest of Europe in 2013.
2011 was the year that started it all, with Egyptians getting out in Tahrir Square in their thousands. Oh wait, they are still there, and still protesting.
Greeks took to Syntagma Square protesting against austerity measures, and an ongoing fight for democracy, as people go without food and without electricity.
Inspired by the Egyptians and the Greeks, and also by events in Iceland, on May 15, 2011, a small bunch of people took to the square in Madrid, Spain. This small group soon blossomed into thousands of protesters, in all major cities, all over Spain.
As austerity grows in Spain, more and more protests continue as thousands of miners, doctors, nurses, teachers, students, lawyers, people of every occupation, take to the streets against the unfairness of a system where the banks get bailed out for their illegal practices, and the people are made to pay.
No doubt, the ongoing protests will continue into the new year. Below are some scenes of past protests.
15m supporters gather in Malaga city.
15m supporters gather in Malaga city.
Citizens  mobilization against the cuts  the abuse of power  the repression.
Citizens' mobilization against the cuts, the abuse of power, the repression.
In June last year, our small group of 15m members in Fuengirola were harassed by the police. We were planning an event anyway, with the inauguration of the mayor and new local government in Fuengirola, but due to the problems with the police, friends from Málaga 15m and Democracia Real Ya! came to give us support and swelled our numbers considerably:
Málaga and Fuengirola 15m supporters in the plaza in Fuengirola.
Málaga and Fuengirola 15m supporters in the plaza in Fuengirola.
Getting ready for the march to the town hall.
Getting ready for the march to the town hall.
After some inspiring speeches, we marched through the streets to the town hall, and then assembled on the steps as can be seen below:
Málaga and Fuengirola 15m members gather on the steps of the town hall in protest.
Málaga and Fuengirola 15m members gather on the steps of the town hall in protest.
The next day a few of us went back, to protest the inauguration ceremony itself:
The municipality censors freedom of expression.
The municipality censors freedom of expression.
Protests continued in 2012, with the government, under Mariano Rajoy, taking more and more away from the people. In July, there was an outcry after a video was published of a speech by Rajoy, where a member of his political party, Andrea Fabra, was clearly heard to say in Spanish the equivalent of "f*ck them all", referring to the people of Spain. Shortly after this, a protest was held in Málaga where this young lady pretty much said "F*ck you too, Fabra."
 F*ck you too Fabra  referring to a comment by Andrea Fabra.
"F*ck you too Fabra" referring to a comment by Andrea Fabra.
This further inspired a graffitti campaign in many Spanish cities with people spray painting the banks and political posters with the words "F*ck them all" referring to the bankers and politicians.
Graffitti popping up on banks and political posters in Fuengirola.
Graffitti popping up on banks and political posters in Fuengirola.
No doubt protests will continue, not only in Spain, but all over Europe, along with the Occupy movement in the USA and other countries where the people have, quite simply, had enough.
One thing for sure, if Gandhi was alive today, he would be considered a terrorist:
Today  Gandhi would be considered a terrorist - seen in Malaga.
Today, Gandhi would be considered a terrorist - seen in Malaga.
More about Spain, 15m, Spanish, Revolution, Protest
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