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article imageOtaru — A quaint little town where music is in the air Special

By Igor I. Solar     Nov 26, 2012 in Travel
Otaru - The Otaru canal, lined by old brick and stone warehouses now used as museums and restaurants, offers visitors an atmosphere of nostalgia and romance enhanced by many historical buildings and delightful handicraft shops selling glassware and music boxes.
The port city of Otaru, in the western side of the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido, has a long history connected to fisheries. The location, on the shores of Ishikari Bay, facing the Sea of Japan, was occupied as a fishing village by the Ainu indigenous people of northern Japan and Russia since the beginning of the 17 Century.
During the Meiji Period (1868 - 1912), along with the port of Hakodate in the southern tip of Hokkaido, Otaru became an important fishery landing place. While Hakodate fishermen dedicated most of their efforts to salmon, the industrial fishery of Otaru concentrated on herring. Over the years, both salmon and herring fisheries had become symbols of the cultural history of this region.
The Otaru Canal is a symbol of the city. At night  the old-style gaslights (now electric)  illuminat...
The Otaru Canal is a symbol of the city. At night, the old-style gaslights (now electric), illuminate the stone stairs and canal-side promenade, providing a nostalgic, romantic atmosphere.
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Otaru s main Japan Railway Station. Otaru Station is about 35 minutes from Sapporo in the Hakodate L...
Otaru's main Japan Railway Station. Otaru Station is about 35 minutes from Sapporo in the Hakodate Line. Rapid trains connect Otaru, via Sapporo, with New Chitose Airport.
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Chuo-Dori. Otaru s Main Street; links the Japan Railway Station and the Otaru Canal.
Chuo-Dori. Otaru's Main Street; links the Japan Railway Station and the Otaru Canal.
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Herring is still an important resource in the waters of Ishikari Bay and the Sea of Japan. However, the heyday of the herring fishery has become a thing of the past. Nonetheless, signs of the times when great fortunes were made by the Aoyama, Ibaraki, and Shiratori families, still remain. They are represented by the great mansions built in Otaru by the fishing tycoons, which are known today as the “Herring Mansions”.
A walk along Miyaku-dori Shopping Arcade is a pleasant experience because of the variety of stores i...
A walk along Miyaku-dori Shopping Arcade is a pleasant experience because of the variety of stores including charming tea-houses, souvenirs shops, glassware, music boxes and even seafood!
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Other remnants of the lucrative herring fishery are the old brick and stone warehouses near the port, and the long canal used by fishing boats and barges to bring the catches to the processing plants. These historic structures are no longer linked to the fishing industry, but have been renovated and converted into charming cafes, restaurants, shops, museums, and also a restaurant belonging to the successful micro-brewery Otaru Beer.
The Otaru Canal is the symbol of the city. The old brick and stone warehouses used during the herrin...
The Otaru Canal is the symbol of the city. The old brick and stone warehouses used during the herring fishing period have been converted to restaurants and museums.
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The Otaru Canal is now the symbol of this city. Old style gaslights, stone stairs and a beautiful canal-side promenade were built. The gaslights have been converted to electricity, but the beautiful illuminated walkways have a nostalgic, romantic atmosphere very popular with young couples. Additional illumination highlights the vegetation covering the old stone warehouses, and pretty flower containers along the canal produce a beautiful nightscape inviting to a delightful evening stroll along the canal. Terraces, bridges and shops lining the old waterway, plus the offer of rickshaw rides through the most interesting sights, make this an interesting section of the city attracting Japanese, Russian and international visitors year-around.
The picturesque Otaru Canal is very popular with artists who line the walkway near the Asakusa Bridg...
The picturesque Otaru Canal is very popular with artists who line the walkway near the Asakusa Bridge to paint the canal. Top, right, is the Chuo Bridge.
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A wide range of fresh, high quality seafood is available in Otaru. There are many fish and shellfish markets, which not only sell live crabs, oysters and scallops to cook at home, but also bake or grill seafood by the sidewalk for consumption at narrow stalls right on the street. Several restaurants offer the famous Hokkaido Ramen, a delicious noodle miso soup. Sushi bars are also plentiful, particularly on Sushi-ya Street, close to the Japan Railway Station.
Besides the beautiful canal area, not far from the railway station is Sakaimachi Street. This is another section of the town which has been carefully preserved and includes several historic buildings such as the Museum of Money in the old Otaru Branch of the Bank of Japan, The Museum of Venetian Art displaying Venetian glassware, clothing and traditional furniture, and the Music Box Museum, which has in its front a steam clock designed by Canadian clockmaker Raymond Saunders who also created and built the steam clock in Gastown, Vancouver, BC.
Near the Otaru Canal is Sakaimachi Street. Sakaimachi-Dori has several historic buildings  stores se...
Near the Otaru Canal is Sakaimachi Street. Sakaimachi-Dori has several historic buildings, stores selling glassware and music boxes, and many seafood shops offering live crabs, scallops and oysters.
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Sakaimachi Dori in Otaru  Hokkaido.
Sakaimachi Dori in Otaru, Hokkaido.
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About half-way along Sakaimachi Street, one comes across “Rokkatei”, a highly regarded Hokkaido sweets’ shop selling, among many other treats, the famous “Marusei” Butter Cookies, a confection made with a mix of Hokkaido butter, California raisins, and white chocolate, sandwiched with butter biscuits.
“Rokkatei” of Hokkaido - Otaru store. Rokkatei fine confectionery is a very prestigious brand in...
“Rokkatei” of Hokkaido - Otaru store. Rokkatei fine confectionery is a very prestigious brand in Japan and other countries in Asia. Note the signs on the left and the pile of boxes on the right showing the beautiful floral designs of Hokkaido-born botanist and graphic artist Naoyuki Sakamoto (1906-1982). (No advertisement intended).
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“Marusei” Butter Cookies  a confection made with a mix of Hokkaido butter  California raisins  a...
“Marusei” Butter Cookies, a confection made with a mix of Hokkaido butter, California raisins, and white chocolate, sandwiched with butter biscuits. Floral designs by Japanese botanist and painter Naoyuki Sakamoto. (No advertisement intended).
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Otaru decorative glassware has become highly regarded in Japan. Many glass workshops can be found throughout the city. The tradition started with the manufacturing of oil lamps. During the peak period of the herring fishery, the production switched to making glass buoys used to hold the long fishing nets. Later on, when the fishery declined, the emphasis turned into the production of glass ornaments of exceptionally refined craftsmanship.
Otaru charms. Music boxes  clocks and colourful Tiffany lamps.
Otaru charms. Music boxes, clocks and colourful Tiffany lamps.
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Another important commercial activity of the town is the manufacturing of beautiful music boxes. There are several shops along Sakaimachi Street selling glassware decorations, Tiffany lamps, and an incredible assortment of music boxes. They come in every size and shape one can imagine. The variety is immense; from stylish piano-shaped cases or romantic porcelain-covered jewel chests, to a wide range of Nigiri-sushi forms. Walking along picturesque Sakaimachi-dori is a real pleasure, since the melodies coming from the music boxes can be heard everywhere reaching a peak inside the fantastic Otaru Music Box Museum.
Music boxes in the shape of Nigiri-sushi  surrounded by a multitude of  Lucky Maneki Neko  cats. Man...
Music boxes in the shape of Nigiri-sushi, surrounded by a multitude of "Lucky Maneki Neko" cats. Maneki Neko (literally "beckoning cat") is one of the most common lucky charms in Japan. Its purpose is to attract business and promote prosperity. They call customers to come into the store.
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Beautifully decorated music boxes are one of the trademarks of the town of Otaru. The quality of Ota...
Beautifully decorated music boxes are one of the trademarks of the town of Otaru. The quality of Otaru music boxes is recognized all over Japan.
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Otaru has a population of about 145,000 people. It is about 35 minutes by train from Sapporo, the capital of Hokkaido. A visit to Otaru may be done within a hectic day-trip from Sapporo, but taking a couple of days allows a more leisurely and thorough visit to this enchanting town. It’s well worth it.
More about Otaru, Hokkaido Japan, Music boxes, Glassworks, Otaru Canal
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