Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.
Connect
Log In Sign Up
Comments   Listen   Print   article:337301:6::0
In the Media

article imageWeird anatomical mashups (includes video)

By Tim Sandle
Nov 20, 2012 in Odd News
Artist Brian Andrews has created some animation called “Hominid.” With his work he has combined skeletons of humans, animals, arachnids and insects. It makes for some intriguing, if disconcerting, images.
Brian Andrews has created a series of art works, captured by animation, which he has called “Hominid". This is a tale of predator and prey inspired by x-ray films of human and animal skeletons.
Here is the video of his work:
For this project, Andrews canvassed hospitals and veterinary offices for extraneous x-ray films. Having compiled an extensive collection of human and animal images, Andrews then chose which animals to combine with humans to create his 'mashuped' images.
A quadruped hominid by Brian Andrews
Brian Andrews
A quadruped hominid by Brian Andrews
image:131822:1::0
Describing his work to The Scientist, Andrews said:
“I’ve always been interested in the boundaries between human and animal, especially apes and primates, which are challenging to our ideas of being human and separate,” says Andrews, who was working on photographs of taxidermied animals when the idea to “provoke the line. I decided to use artistic license and story telling to literally combine our bodies with animal bodies.”
A two-headed hominid by Brian Andrews
Brian Andrews
A two-headed hominid by Brian Andrews
image:131825:1::0
Commenting on the work, Robert Streiffer, a bioethicist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, said: "Andrews’ work is as fantastical as it is topical. Bioethicists still struggle with the morality of animal-human hybrids as researchers continues to push the boundaries of what’s possible. Even some people who support human embryo research may feel uncomfortable with the notion of genetically engineering chimeras and hybrid animals."
Andrews' project was part of an initiative undertaken at the Ex’pression College of Digital Arts.
article:337301:6::0
More about Anatomy, Physiology, Mashups, Brian Andrews
More news from
Latest News
Top News
Engage

Corporate

Help & Support

News Links

copyright © 2014 digitaljournal.com   |   powered by dell servers