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article imageAbu Qatada plans to sue British government for unlawful detention

By Katerina Nikolas     Nov 20, 2012 in World
Abu Qatada, infamous hate preacher and expensive drain on the taxpayer, intends to sue the British government for £10 million for unlawful detention.
In spite of repeated attempts to deport Qatada from Britain, the Muslim cleric remains firmly ensconced, now free on bail. The BBC reported deputy prime minister Nick Clegg reiterated the government position, saying: "We are determined to deport him, we strongly disagree with the court ruling. We are going to challenge it, we are going to take it to appeal. We are absolutely determined to see this man get on a plane and go back to Jordan, he does not belong here. He should not be in this country, he is a dangerous person."
However, the British government could end up doling out a large payout to Qatada if he follows though with plans to sue for unlawful detention, having served a prison sentence without being charged with any crime. According to the Daily Mail Qatada's brother, Ibrahim Othman, said: "He said he hopes to get £10 million for being wrongly put in jail. He says he will make the claim when the court processes are finished for his extended mistreatment. He has done nothing against the British people but the British authorities put him jail for many years. He has not had any trial in Britain. It is only right that he should have the money. He hasn’t been able to work for a long time because he has been in jail, so how could he survive without compensation when it is all over?"
Qatada has already been awarded £2,500 by the European Court of Human Rights. He and his family continue to live at the taxpayers' expense, receiving benefits and free housing. Following protests outside his home after his release from prison, the Daily Mail reported the family will be moved to a secret location, again at the expense of the taxpayer.
Although Qatada's lawyers have argued against his deportation to Jordan, his intent is to buy a new home in Jordan if he is allowed to return as a free man.
More about Abu Qatada, European Court of Human Rights, British government, Belmarsh Prison
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