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article imageJohn Fogerty to publish his memoirs in 2014

By Layne Weiss     Nov 12, 2012 in Entertainment
Former Creedence Clearwater Revival frontman John Fogerty has reached a deal with Little, Brown, and Company, publisher Michael Pietsch announced Monday. Fogerty's memoir is scheduled to be published in 2014.
Known for writing and singing rock n roll classics such as "Bad Moon Rising," and "Proud Mary," Fogerty is regarded as one of rock n roll's most influential figures. In his long awaited book, the rock n roll legend will recount the highs and lows of journey, including notorious clashes with band members and record executives, The Associated Press reports.
Last month, marked the 40th anniversary of the break-up of Creedence Clearwater Revival.The group was only together for four years, but the group did so much in that time. Their first hit, "Suzy Q," was released in 1968. CCR also released singles such as "Born on the Bayou," "Proud Mary," and "Fortunate Son." The group also appeared at Woodstock and on the Ed Sullivan show.
The band's song "Fortunate Son" spoke out against the Vietnam war. Another CCR hit, "Who'll Stop The Rain," has also been regarded as a protest against the war.
CCR frontman John Fogerty became frustrated with his bandmates, his brother and guitarist Tom, drummer Doug "Cosmo" Clifford, and bassist Stu Cook. Tom Fogerty left the band in 1971, and John told the remaining bandmates to start contributing their own songs, which he would just play rhythm guitar on.
This turned out to be a disaster. The band released Mardi Gras in 1972. Rolling Stone Magazine reviewer John Landau theorized that since the album was so bad, it may one day be regarded as "Fogerty's Revenge."
Landau couldn't believe that the same people (besides one) who brought us hits such as "Bad Moon Rising,"Fortunate Son," "Down on the Corner" and so many more hits had actually released Mardi Gras. He wrote that there was not a single off that album that deserved to be on the same list as some of CCR's greats. He said it was "the worst album" he had ever heard from a major rock band.
During this time, Fogerty began arguing with the band's label Fantasy Records over contracts. The group announced their break-up on October 16, 1972.
The battle between Fogerty and Fantasy Records did not end there, however. According to The Associated Press both sides battled for years.
The war between John Fogerty and Fantasy Records became so intense, it went all the way to the Supreme Court, John Fogerty's website notes.
The singer's solo career has included the hits "Centerfield" and "The Old Man Down The Road." He also has an album due out next year and has plans for collaborations with the Foo Fighters, Keith Urban, and many others, The Associated Press reports.
Fogerty has quite the story to tell. In his book, he'll talk about the whirlwind of superstardom CCR received, and the pressures that went along with it. He'll write about his rocky relationships with other band members, notably his brother, Tom, and he'll write about the way Fantasy Records "victimized" him. "I want to tell the story of how I fought-hard-to maintain my artistic integrity in the face of opposing forces," Fogerty wrote on his website.
The book will also discuss a lot of good in Fogerty's life including meeting his wife Julie and building a family with her, which he credits with bringing him back to music. Despite his bad experiences, the rock legend seems excited for what's next and grateful for the chance to share the story of what's happened so far, in his own words. Fogerty said up until now, he was too hurt by everything to share what happened, but that now, he's ready.
"The kid from El Cerrito wanted to be the best musician in the world. My promise to myself," Fogerty writes. "I accomplished that goal against all odds, only to have it fall apart on top of me. The songs and the music stopped; you didn't hear from John Fogerty for years. All of it took its toll on me. I couldn't write a song, sing a song. And it was so hard on me. All of the lawsuits and betrayals. I was personally fading away. My story will share the ups and downs and how it all affected me. The road back was a bumpy one, and I knew that it would take years to come out of it, but I did. Happily, I did, with my dear wife, Julie, by my side."
More about creedence clearwater revival, Classic rock, john fogerty, Memoirs
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