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article imageReview: 'Love is An Uphill Thing' by Jimmy Savile Special

By Steve Hayes     Oct 13, 2012 in World
Jimmy Savile's autobiography, "Love is An Uphill Thing" is in short supply and prices are rising fast on ebay. In this 1976 book, the continuing torrent of allegations against the former star find ample support.
Savile's 1976 autobiography is full of anecdotes about his predatory sexual behaviour. In one story, Savile, who was the manager of the Locarno Ballroom in Leeds at the time, recounts an incident with a young runaway. He said:
A high-ranking lady police officer came in one night and showed me a picture of an attractive girl who had run away from a remand home.
‘Ah,’ says I all serious, ‘if she comes in I’ll bring her back tomorrow but I’ll keep her all night first as my reward’.
Savile goes on to describe how the girl came to the dance hall that evening and stayed the night with him before he handed her over to the police at half past eleven the next morning.
The officeress was dissuaded from bringing charges against me by her colleagues for it was well known that were I to go, I would probably take half the station with me.
In another anecdote Savile narrates how he asked the organisers of a charity event to choose a group of girls to spend the night camping with him after a disco. He continues:
Six girls were selected and all of them were given matching mini-skirts and white boots. They looked good enough to eat. The first thing was that the father of one of the girls arrived and hauled her off home. She protested loudly but dad would have none of this preposterous situation.
This wasn't the only time Savile had to deal with an irate parent. In one incident he describes how he was caught naked in a caravan with a group of girls. He said:
The heat of the albeit innocent night had caused the girls to shed the majority of their day clothes. In some cases all.
We all resembled some great human octopus. Again the knock.
One of the girls rose from the human pile like Venus. Peering out of the curtain she became rigid with fright.
‘It’s my mother and father,’ she hissed. There was a silent movie pandemonium. Escape was uppermost in my mind but that was impossible.
According to Jimmy Savile, a devout Catholic, the Eleventh Commandment is: Don't get caught. With obvious relish he offered an illustration. He described how six girls spent the night with him and his minder. In the morning, when Savile was out, one girl's furious mother knocked on the door. Savile said the minder hid in the wardrobe and let the girls deal with the mother. He continued:
I train my men well and, to date, we have not been found out. Which, after all, is the 11th commandment, is it not?
These are Jimmy Savile's own words. No one twisted his arm. No one coerced him or tricked him. He, of his own accord, chose to write down these stories, and many more, and put them in a book. The manuscript was read by his publishers, Cornet, who clearly judged it worthy of publication. The book was read by reviewers, critics and ordinary readers. It was clearly popular, having first been published in 1974 under the title As It Happens.
More about Jimmy Savile, Autobiography, Child sexual assault, Scandal, Catholic
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