Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.

article imageTwitter earns more in mobile advertising than Facebook ─ for now?

By Leigh Goessl     Sep 6, 2012 in Internet
A new report issued by eMarketer forecasts Twitter will have a better year monetizing mobile than Facebook, but this is expected to be only temporary.
The researchers released their latest figures on projected mobile advertising revenue in the U.S. Twitter ranks third on the list, while Facebook landed sixth. According to eMarketer, Twitter will earn $129.7 million from mobile ads this year, while Facebook is projected to earn about $72.7 million.
It is important to note that Twitter has been invested in monetizing mobile longer than Facebook has been. This could account for the disparity in revenues.
However, Google beats them all by far, at $1,423.10 million.
Facebook is not expected to be trailing for very long. The analysts also forecast figures for 2013 and 2014, and it is during these years some change is anticipated by Facebook and Twitter. By 2014, Twitter is expected to earn about $444.10 million from mobile ads and analysts said Facebook figures will jump to $629.40. Google will still far outpace both social networks; eMarketer estimates their earnings in 2014 to be $3,578.50 million.
Looking at the big picture, as TechCrunch points out, eMarketer predicted mobile advertising in the U.S. will generate sales of $12 billion by 2016.
Business Insider warns these predictions made by eMarketer should be taken with a grain of salt and outlines its reasons why. A Forbes article counters this view and outlines why Twitter is in a stronger position.
Either way, generally many analysts across the board agree that mobile is going to explode over the next three to four years. As such, companies that monetize through advertising are eagerly pushing their way to be mobile-friendly to get a piece of that action.
More about Social media, Facebook, Twitter, Mobile advertising, mobile ads
More news from