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article imageFearless ARNO volunteers face Isaac head on

By Greta McClain     Aug 29, 2012 in World
New Orleans - As many gulf coast residents headed north out of the path of Hurricane Isaac, the dedicated staff at Animal Rescue New Orleans were concentrating on the animals in there care, securing the building and staying with the animals in the shelter.
With then Tropical Storm Isaac's path estimated to make landfall in or near New Orleans, the all volunteer staff at Animal Rescue New Orleans (ARNO) began preparations to ensure all their animals remained safe. On Sunday the staff began preparations for the storm, putting out requests for bottled water, generators, and ice, as well securing temporary foster homes for some of the animals. On Monday ARNO announced via their facebook page that volunteers would be staying with the animals overnight Tuesday and Wednesday. The announcement went on to say that all dogs have been brought inside and that many of the volunteers had taken a dog home with them, clearing space so the remaining animals could be inside.
The Examiner quotes a statement issued by ARNO director Charlotte Bass-Lily, which says: "We need as much help as you can get for us. One our dogs got very ill this morning and we had to get him to the only ER open. We have no power. Generator is running fans and lights. The area has had high street flooding since 3:30 am.
Only four volunteers, two are vet techs, are caring for over 100 animals. The storm hit the back of the shelter all night long and still cannot see the damage as the storm is still hitting hard. All the animals and volunteers are in the front of the shelter."
Animal Rescue New Orleands was created after Hurricane Katrina by the animal first responders who were on the scene in the immediate aftermath of that devastating storm. It is the first no-kill shelter in the region run solely by volunteers. They have assisted more than 7,000 animals since March of 2006.
Updates will be provided as information becomes available.
More about New orleans, Animal rescue, Animal Rescue New Orleans, Pets, Animals