Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.

article imageStudy: Quitting smoking difficult for men and women alike

By Ajit Jha     Aug 25, 2012 in Health
According to a recent study, the enduring belief that women are less successful than men in quitting smoking is questionable. The study, finds little difference in cessation between sexes across all age groups.
According to the study published in the Journal Tobacco Control: “There is relatively little difference in cessation between the sexes”.
The study compiled data from major national surveys across the US, Canada and England. The researchers could identify a cessation pattern consistent across the nations: Women below 50 were more likely to quit smoking in comparison to men surveyed across the three nations, while men over 60 were more likely to quit smoking in comparison to the same age group women. However, the authors could not find reason for the pattern observed.
This study claims to be the largest epidemiological study to date and the longstanding belief that women find it more difficult to quit smoking than men remains unevidenced according to the study. “The myth of female disadvantage at quitting smoking is bad, first and foremost, for women,” notes the study because it discourages women in their efforts at cessation. They, most likely end their efforts prematurely. The authors also note at the same time this myth is equally disadvantageous to men because they think that they are at an advantage and therefore may not exert proper effort needed to quit smoking.
However, sex based smoking difficulties, despite the findings of the new study, should not be overlooked. Several studies have reported that women experience more severe withdrawal symptoms in comparison to men when they quit smoking. Also, nicotine replacement therapy may not be as beneficial to women as to men leading to the difficulties experienced by women when they quit smoking.
Tobacco use can lead to nicotine dependence making it a difficult habit to quit in addition to serious health problems, cessation can dramatically reduce the risks associated with smoking.
Most often, multiple interventions may be needed to quit smoking. Smoking is a difficult habit to quit and tobacco use can lead to nicotine dependence and cause serious health problems. Smoking cessation can dramatically reduce the risk of health problems caused from tobacco use. There are effective treatments available against tobacco dependence. According to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, “there are more former smokers than current smokers,” in our country today.
Kicking smoking habits, for which there are a large number of options available, is the first step women and men can take towards leading a long and healthy life. However, smokers – both men and women – are also likely to relapse for different reasons. Women will possibly need proper weight management, emotional and psychological support in their cessation efforts.
More about Smoking, Smoking cessation, Quitting smoking, Quit smoking, Men
More news from