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article imageChina & Russia's reactions to Obama's 'red line' comment on Syria

By Paul Iddon     Aug 22, 2012 in Politics
U.S. President Barack Obama has stated that Syrian use of chemical weapons in this conflict would be a "red line" for the United States. China claims that this is an excuse to militarily intervene in the war-ravaged country.
BBC has quoted the Chinese state news agency, Xinhau of stating that, "Once again, Western powers are digging deep for excuses to intervene militarily [in Syria]."
China and Russia have consistently vetoed United Nations Security Council Resolutions that condemned or threatened sanctions on the Syrian regime of Bashar al-Assad. These latest comments from Xinhau come after President Obama announced that, "There would be enormous consequences if we start seeing movement on the chemical weapons front or the use of chemical weapons." These remarks have been dubbed as "dangerously irresponsible," by Xinhau.
The report says that what it calls "foreign crusades" undertaken by western powers will only worsen the ongoing crisis. China has stated that a UN ceasefire is the best solution to the crisis.
International Business Times has quoted the Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov as saying that U.S. military intervention in the Syrian Civil War would be in violation of international law. He claims that Moscow and Beijing are committed "to the need to strictly adhere to the norms of international law... and not to allow their violation."
Russia has also said that it believes Syria has no intention of using chemical weapons and is well able to safeguard them. Russia states that a "confidential dialogue," with the Syrian regime has firmly convinced Russia that, "the Syrian authorities do not intend to use these weapons and are capable of keeping them under control themselves."
On a related note, the Syria's Deputy Prime Minister Qadri Jamil said to reporters in Moscow that, "Direct military intervention is impossible. Those who are contemplating this evidently want to see the crisis expand beyond Syria's border."
He added that, "The west is looking for an excuse for direct intervention. If this excuse does not work, it will look for another cause."
Today in Syria an aerial bombing followed by a tank assault rocked the neighbourhood of Kafar Soussa in Damascus. The number dead is said to be between 23 to 40. Fighter jets have once again strafed rebel held areas in the northern city of Aleppo. Rebels are thought to hold about 60% of the city at this time.
According to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights some 198 people were killed yesterday in the fighting in the country.
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