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In the Media

Study: Canadians reportedly spending less time on mobile devices

article:331230:3::0
By Andrew Moran
Aug 21, 2012 in Technology
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Toronto - Canadians are technology enthusiasts, but as they continue their love affair with all things smartphones, tablets and e-readers, the amount of time using these devices is less frequent than compared to a year ago, a new study says.
Who doesn’t love the latest electronic gadgets? Everywhere you go, there are people using an iPhone, reading a book on a Kindle or browsing the Internet through a tablet. Although it seems the general public is using these devices all the time, a new study suggests otherwise.
In a study of the mobile market in Canada by Ipsos Reid, it found that the frequency of mobile devices remain the same, but the average duration of time individuals say they use these devices has lessened significantly.
During a standard weekday in spring of this year, Canadians reported spending 2.8 hours each day on their smartphone (down 3.3 hours from a year ago), 2.4 hours on tablets (down from 3.2 hours) and 1.8 hours on e-readers (down from 2.1 hours).
Furthermore, the same research found that the level of smartphone and tablet users downloading new apps and deleting old ones is also on the decline.
“Initially, seasonality was suspected as a cause of this reported behaviour,” said Mary Beth Barbour, Senior Vice President with Ipsos Reid, in a news release. “However, the average duration of use has failed to return to the higher levels recorded a year earlier in spring 2011. This is beginning to suggest a potential shift in usage patterns.”
In total, Canadians reported using their smartphone 222 times every month, 115 times using the tablet and 38 times on an e-reader.
“Such changes further support the notion that Canadians are maturing as mobile users,” added Barbour. “Decreases may be due in part to users settling in with their device and usage levels normalizing as the novelty wears off and users are in less of an exploratory phase. Further, shifts may also be related to the expansion of the user base beyond the ‘techies’ and early adopters to the broader population who may be less active users.”
The results were discovered conducting two waves of research in February 2011 and March and April of 2012. Both online studies were done with 2,000 adult residents. The surveys contain a margin of error of +/- two percentage points.
article:331230:3::0
More about Canadians, Mobile devices, Study, Ipsos reid, Time
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