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article imageJapanese HTV-3 space freighter berthed to ISS

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By Anne Sewell     Jul 29, 2012 in Science
The HTV-3, also known as Kounotori3, space freighter successfully docked with the International Space Station on July 27.
Digital Journal reported on July 21 that the Japanese HTV-3 space freighter had successfully lifted off for the International Space Station.
The unmanned craft was set to deliver a 4.6-ton cargo of clothing, fresh food and equipment to the ISS.
Working from the robotic workstation inside the station's cupola, NASA flight Engineer Joe Acaba, together with flight engineer Aki Hoshide, captured the 16.5-ton cargo ship with the Canadian Space Agency-provided robotic arm at 8:23 am, as the HTV-3 flew within about 40 feet of the ISS.
At 10:34 am (EDT) on Saturday, Hoshide used the ISS's Canadarm2 robotic arm to safely install the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) H-II transfer vehicle, or HTV-3, to its docking port on the Earth-facing side of the Harmony Node.
The HTV-3 unmanned cargo transfer spacecraft, which is also known as Kounotori3 (meaning "white stork" in Japanese), is 33-foot long, 13-foot in diameter, and is capable of delivering both internal and external hardware and supplies to the ISS.
Interior of HTV space freighter
Interior of HTV space freighter
NASA
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After equalizing pressures between the craft, the crew opened the hatches on Saturday and began the process of removing around 7,000 pounds of supplies.
These supplies include food and clothing for the astronauts, a remote-controlled Earth-observation camera for environmental studies, a catalytic reactor for the station's water regeneration system, an aquatic habitat experiment as well as a Japanese cooling water recirculation pump.
The space freighter will remain at the International Space Station until September 6, when it will be detached from the ISS and allowed to burn up on re-entry over the Pacific Ocean.
In the video, NASA Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly talks with NASA astronaut Cady Coleman about how complicated the docking procedure actually is.
article:329567:10::0
More about Japan, htv3, Space craft, Cargo ship, International Space Station
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