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article imageGOP candidate Wes Riddle says slavery benefited African-Americans

By JohnThomas Didymus     Jul 24, 2012 in Politics
GOP congressional candidate Wes Riddle, who recently got Ron Paul's endorsement, wrote on his personal blog in April, an op-ed in which he attacked the "ideology of multiculturalism," and said African-Americans benefited from slavery.
Riddle, commenting on the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, said, "...it proved to be the unintended transmission belt that brought Africans into the orbit of Western freedom."
In a separate note written by his spokesman Garret Smith, and posted to his Facebook page, he called for impeachment of Obama, explaining that "the reasoning for President Obama's impeachment begins with the fact that the State Department is giving away seven strategic, resource-laden Alaskan islands to Russia." He spins a conspiracy theory that alleges that "The agreement was negotiated in total secrecy, not allowing the state of Alaska to participate in the negotiations, and... the public was not given any opportunity to comment."
Mother Jones reporter Tim Murphy, in an article about Riddle, titled: "This Conspiracy-Toting Conservative Blogger Could Be Headed to Congress," writes that Riddle's statements are significant because he "... isn't merely another commenter on the Internet. He could be coming to Washington. A few days after this Facebook post on the Alaskan islands, he pulled in 15 percent of the vote in a crowded GOP primary for Texas' 25th congressional district, a solidly red splotch of Central Texas that went to John McCain by 10 points in 2008." According to Mother Jones, Riddle stands a good chance of becoming the district's next congressman.
In the article posted on his blog, Horse Sense, Riddle complains about the recent pattern of immigration that has led to the "browning of America." He says, "For the past 40 years, most immigrants have come from Asia, Africa and Latin America, instead of from Europe. Moreover, the birthrates for these and other non-white minorities are substantially higher than for whites. This has led to a 'browning of America' and to multiculturalism in fact."
According to Riddle, the "ideology" of multiculturalism that promotes the pattern of immigration from "Asia, Africa and Latin America, instead of Europe" is a "fallacy that poses a vital threat to America. Indeed, it is a tool of the political left for changing the country’s educational and political institutions."
Riddle indulges himself unabashedly in ethnocentric chauvinism: "Western civilization has produced the height of all civilizations in certain respects, to include literature. As Saul Bellow pointed out a few years ago, there ain’t a Tolstoy of the Zulus or a Proust amongst the Papuans."
He concedes graciously that Western civilization was not perfect but in his view it was better than all other alternatives. He protests: "I don’t want America to be a microcosm of the world, if by that you would include all the ignorance, ugliness, vice and corruption that are present in the world—chiefly (though not exclusively) from non-Western imports."
According to Riddle, even the worst actions of Western civilization benefited its victims. He singles out African-Americans as unintended beneficiaries of "slavery in America." He says: "Slavery in America was clearly harmful and wrong to the people who lived under it, but it proved to be the unintended transmission belt that brought Africans into the orbit of Western freedom."
For those who may question the benefits of transmission of Africans "into the orbit of Western freedom," he asks: "Are the descendants of slaves really worse off? Would Jesse Jackson be better off living in Uganda? Would we? (Don't answer that)."
Mother Jones reports that Ron Paul, endorsing Riddle, said: "Liberty voters have a strong choice in this CD-25 Republican runoff. I hope my generous supporters will help Wes win this runoff because we need more men like him." According to Mother Jones, Riddle has spoken against public programs like social security and food stamps, and powers delegated to the states under the 10th Amendment.
Wes Riddle: Right Wing conspiracy theorist 'headed for Congress?'
Riddle, in the note posted to his Facebook page which alleges that the "State Department is giving away seven strategic, resource-laden Alaskan islands to Russia," writes: "the seven endangered islands to be given away in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea include one the size of Rhode Island and Delaware combined."
According to Smith, "The agreement was negotiated in total secrecy, not allowing the state of Alaska to participate in the negotiations, and... the public was not given any opportunity to comment,"
Mother Jones reporter Tim Murphy, notes, however, that Obama did not give away any islands, but that the allegation is in connection with a treaty signed by President George H.W.Bush in 1991.
According to FactCheck.org, "The U.S. has never claimed ownership of the islands identified in viral emails and websites. They lie far closer to the coast of Siberia than to Alaska." FactCheck.org continues: "All (of the islands) are far closer to the Russian mainland than to the Alaskan mainland. All lie on the Russian side of the U.S.-Russia maritime boundary set by a treaty that the U.S. Senate ratified overwhelmingly more than two decades ago, after being signed by President George H.W. Bush, and with the support of both of Alaska’s senators..."
According to Murphy, Riddle's source for his "Alaska conspiracy theory" appears to be a February op-ed in WorldNetDaily, written by former Alaska Senate candidate Joe Miller.
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